Summary of Proposed Action:  Changes term from “continuing” license to “professional’ license to reflect the new name of license.  This will affect 32 rules. 

 

Changing Term from Continuing to Professional Licenses:

32 rules amended

 

# of Rules Amended

 

# of Rules Amended

Division 10

1

Division 52

1

Division 17

2

Division 60

3

Division 18

6

Division 65

5

Division 38

1

Division 66

2

Division 42

4

Division 90

1

Division 50

1

Division 100

5

 

Background:  The agency has been changing this term as rules have needed other amendments.  The 32 rules included in this rulemaking are the remaining rules that still use to the “continuing” term.   This rulemaking will finalize the transition to the Professional Teaching License. 

 

Fiscal Impact: N/A

 

Copy of the 32 Proposed Rules

Division 10: 1 rule

584-010-0006

Definitions

(1) “Approved Institution:” A U.S. regionally accredited or internationally accredited institution of higher education approved to prepare licensed personnel by the governmental jurisdiction in which the institution is located.

(2) “Approved Program:” A program of educator preparation approved by the Commission and offered by a regionally accredited institution. As it applies to out-of-state or international programs, a program approved by the licensure body of the governmental jurisdiction authorized to approve educator preparation programs.

(3) “Area for Improvement (AFI):” A statement cited by the Commission or the on-site program or unit review team indicating that a unit or program has not met expected levels of achievement in one or more elements of a standard. The Commission and the unit or program review team may cite one or more areas for improvement and still recommend or find that the standard is “met.”

(4) “At Risk Unit:” A unit that the Commission determines is “at risk” of becoming “low-performing.” The “at risk” designation would follow an onsite review by the Commission and findings of multiple areas for improvement. Such a unit is required to respond to Commission-imposed conditions and stipulations and must provide evidence within the time indicated by the Commission that the Commission’s concerns have been addressed. Units receiving an “at risk” designation will be subject to an on-site review team follow-up visit that focuses on the areas for improvement noted by the accreditation team during the original visit.

(5) “Candidate:” Candidate includes but is not limited to persons preparing to teach, teachers who are continuing their professional development enrolled in an approved program and persons preparing for other professional roles in schools such as administrators, school counselors, school psychologists, and school social workers in a program approved by the Commission.

(6) “Commission:” Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC).

(7) “Conceptual Framework:” An underlying structure in a professional education unit that gives conceptual meaning to the unit’s operations through an articulated rationale and provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, faculty scholarship and service, and unit accountability.

(8) “Consortium:” An advisory body to the unit that reviews, evaluates, and makes recommendations in accordance with OAR 584-017-1025 Consortium.

(9) “Director of Teacher Education:” The Commission staff member responsible for coordinating program approval within the agency.

(10) “Educator Preparation Programs:” Programs preparing licensed teachers, personnel service specialists, or administrators. Oregon Revised Statutes use the term “teacher education” to refer to all programs preparing licensed educational personnel for public elementary and secondary schools, and is not exclusive to programs for preparation of classroom teachers.

(11) “Executive Director:” The Executive Director of the Commission.

(12) “Field or Clinical Experiences:” All supervised clinical field experiences including student teaching, internships, observation experiences and experience necessary to complete an education preparation licensure program.

(13) “Institutional Report:” A report that provides the institutional and unit contexts, a description of the unit’s conceptual framework, and evidence that the unit is meeting the Commission-adopted unit standards. The report serves as primary documentation for on-site review teams conducting on-site visits.

(14) “Liaison Officer:” The person designated by the unit to submit all program modifications for Commission approval, issue all recommendations for licensure under the approved program, authorize all waivers of professional courses for students enrolled in the program, and handle all correspondence between Commission staff and the unit.

(15) “Low Performing Unit:” A unit is determined to be “low performing” by the Commission if following on on-site review team visit, the imposition of conditions or stipulations and a subsequent follow-up on-site visit, the institution failed to meet the Commission’s standards of quality and effectiveness. Units found to be “low performing” are denied TSPC approval and accreditation to offer educator licensure programs. A unit denied accreditation is prohibited from offering educator preparation programs in Oregon and denied from recommending educators for licensure for a minimum of two years. At the end of such time, the unit may apply for program approval (accreditation) and is required to submit a formal application and demonstrate that the problems identified in the original unit review have been addressed and that the program meets all current requirements for program approval and educator licensure in effect at the time of application for approval.

(16) “Major Modifications:” Changes of program philosophy, curricula, practica, resources, personnel, or performance standards

(17) “Off Campus Programs:” Include but are not limited to:

(a) Off-campus programs in the same state; or

(b) Off-campus programs offered at sites outside of the state or in another country.

(c) Branch campuses must be included in the unit’s review if the:

(A) Programs are limited in number and size;

(B) Programs are located in close proximity to the parent campus; or

(C) Program completers are eligible for licensure in Oregon.

(18) "On-Site Review Team:“ Team appointed by the Commission to conduct an on-site review for purposes of approval of educator licensure preparation programs.

(19) "Program:" Program includes but is not limited to an academic program designed for one of the following outcomes: Add an endorsement, grade level authorization or result in a new licensure area such as an Initial or Continuing, Professional License in teaching, administration or personnel service.

(20) "Regional Accrediting Associations:" Colleges and universities approved for teacher education must be accredited by the appropriate regional association at the time the degree or program is completed. The regional associations are: New England Association of Schools and Colleges; Commission on Institutions of Higher Education; North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; The Higher Learning Commission; Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities; Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools; Commission on Higher Education; Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; Commission on Colleges; or Western Association of Schools and Colleges; Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities.

(21) “Specialized Professional Associations or SPAs:” The national organizations that represent teachers, professional education faculty, and other school professionals who teach a specific subject matter (e.g., mathematics or social studies), teach students at a specific developmental level (i.e., early childhood, elementary, middle level, or secondary), teach students with specific needs (e.g., bilingual education or special education), administer schools (e.g., principals or superintendents), or provide services to students (e.g., school counselors or school psychologists). Many of these associations are member organizations of NCATE and have standards for both students in schools and candidates preparing to work in schools.

(22) "Unit:" Also known as the “professional education unit.” The college, school, or department or other administrative bodies in colleges, universities, or other organizations recognized by the Commission as having the responsibility for managing or coordinating all programs offered for the initial and advanced preparation of teachers and other school professionals regardless of where these programs are housed in an institution. The professional education unit must include in its accreditation review all programs offered by the institution for the purpose of preparing teachers and other school personnel to work in pre-k through twelfth grade settings.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430; 342.455 - –42.495; 342.533
Hist.: TSPC 2-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-08; TSPC 9-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-14-12

Division 17: 2 rules

584-017-1032

Evidence of Effectiveness for Continuing  Professional Teaching License Preparation

(1) Each candidate preparing for a Continuing  Professional Teaching License assembles a collection of evidence that documents the candidate's advanced knowledge’ skills and competencies as designated in OAR 584-018-0102. The collection of evidence includes:

(a) Long term goals of study based on content goals and district standards that determine the knowledge and skills each student needs;

(b) Instructional plans that incorporate knowledge of subject matter, the developmental levels of the students and research-based educational practices that are sensitive to individual differences and diverse cultures;

(c) Evidence of the ability to establish a classroom climate that is conducive to learning for all students;

(d) Data on student progress toward attainment of long term goals, refinement of plans for instruction and establishment of alternative goals for students when necessary;

(e) Evidence of collaboration with parents, colleagues and community members to provide assistance to students and their families to promote learning;

(f) Evidence of the use of emerging research on teaching, learning and school improvement; and

(g) Evidence of participation in designing, evaluating and improving opportunities for teaching.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-017-1035

Verification of Program Completion for All Licensure Programs

The unit assures that candidates have completed the program successfully.

(1) The unit documents that candidates for licensure have acquired the knowledge and demonstrated the competencies required for the authorization level(s) and endorsement(s).

(2) The unit documents that candidates for licensure have completed the required field experience successfully.

(3) The unit attests that the candidates have passed the licensure tests required for the authorization levels and endorsements for which the unit is recommending. Evidence of program completion is stored in each student’s appropriate files including a copy of the C-2 form filed with the Commission as verification of the student’s having met all licensure requirements.

(4) Program completion for purposes of reporting under Title II of the Higher Education Improvement Act (HEIA) means the latest date at which a candidate completes all of the requirements for an Initial I Teaching License.

(a) All candidates completing an approved initial teacher preparation program must be reported to the Commission for Title II HEIA reporting purposes in the year in which all requirements are completed whether the candidate applies for licensure with TSPC.

(6) Candidates for an Initial I Teaching License will hold a minimum of a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution or from an institution that is deemed to offer a degree comparable to a regionally accredited institution, including but not limited to a foreign equivalent of such a degree.

(7) Candidates for a Continuing  Professional Teaching License will hold a master's or higher degree i’ arts and sciences or an advanced degree in the professions from a regionally accredited institution in the United States, or the foreign equivalent of such degree approved by the Commission.

(8) Candidates for Initial Administrator License will hold a Master’s degree or higher in the arts and sciences or an advanced degree in the professions from a regionally accredited institution in the United States, or the foreign equivalent of such degree approved by the Commission.

(9) Candidates for Continuing Administrator License shall have completed a minimum of 18 semester or 27 quarter hours of graduate credit beyond the Master's degree.

(10) Candidates for Initial School Counselor, School Psychologist or School Social Worker License will hold a minimum of a Master's degree in behavioral sciences from a regionally accredited institution in the United States, or the foreign equivalent of such degree approved by the Commission.

(11) Candidates for Continuing School Counselor, School Psychologist or School Social Worker License will have completed an advanced program in professional competencies consisting of a minimum of six semester hours of graduate credit.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

Division 18:   6 rules

584-018-0150

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Library Media Endorsement

(1) Completion of a commission-approved library media academic program, to include completion of a practicum experience and passage of the commission-approved subject-matter examination is required in order to add the Library Media Endorsement to any Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License. (See, OAR 584-060-0071.)

(2) The endorsement is valid for assignments in library media programs in grades prekindergarten through twelve (12).

(3) Library Media candidates demonstrate skill in use of information and ideas: Candidates must:

(a) Encourage reading and lifelong learning by stimulating interests and fostering competencies in the effective use of ideas and information. Candidates:

(A) Demonstrate ways to establish and maintain a positive educational climate in the library media center;

(B) Identify relationships among facilities, programs, and environment that impact student learning; and

(C) Plan and organize library media centers according to their use by the learning community.

(b) Apply a variety of strategies to ensure access to resources and information in a variety of formats, to all members of the learning community. Candidates:

(A) Support flexible and open access for the library media center and its services;

(B) Identify barriers to equitable access to resources and services;

(C) Facilitate access to information in print, nonprint, and electronic formats; and

(D) Comply with and communicate the legal and ethical codes of the profession.

(c) Promote efficient and ethical information-seeking behavior as part of the school library program and its services. Candidates:

(A) Model strategies to locate, evaluate and use information for specific purposes;

(B) Identify and address student interests and motivations;

(C) Interact with the learning community to access, communicate and interpret intellectual content; and

(D) Adhere to and communicate legal and ethical policies.

(d) Create a positive educational environment which promotes reading, literacy, and use of appropriate technology for diverse learners. Candidates:

(A) Are aware of major trends in reading material for children and youth;

(B) Select materials in multiple formats to address the needs and interests of diverse young readers and learners; and

(C) Use a variety of strategies to promote leisure reading. They model their personal enjoyment of reading in order to promote the habits of creative expression and lifelong reading.

(4) Library Media Candidates demonstrate skill in teaching and learning. Candidates must:

(a) Model and promote collaborative planning and the use of technology tools with teachers in order to teach concepts and skills of information processes integrated with classroom curriculum. Candidates:

(A) Work with classroom teachers to co-plan, co-teach, and co-assess information skills instruction. The library media specialist as teacher of information skills makes use of a variety of instructional strategies and assessment tools; and

(B) Analyze the role of student interest and motivation in instructional design. Student learning experiences are created, implemented and evaluated in partnership with teachers and other educators.

(b) Partner with other education professionals to develop and deliver an integrated information literacy curriculum. Candidates:

(A) Employ strategies to integrate the information literacy curriculum with content curriculum;

(B) Incorporate technology to promote efficient and equitable access to information beyond print resources; and

(C) Assist students to use technology to access, analyze, and present information.

(c) Design and implement instruction that supports student interests, needs, and experiences to assure successful learning. Candidates:

(A) Design library media instruction that assesses learner needs, instructional methodologies, and information processes to assure that each is integral to information skills instruction; and

(B) Support the learning of all students and other members of the learning community, including those with diverse learning styles, abilities and needs. Information skills instruction is based on student interests and learning needs and is linked to student achievement.

(5) Demonstrated skill in professional collaboration and leadership. Candidates must:

(a) Provide leadership and establish connections with the greater library and education community. Candidates:

(A) Demonstrate the potential for establishing connections to other libraries and the larger library community for resource sharing, networking, and developing common policies and procedures;

(B) Articulate the role of their professional associations and journals in their own professional growth;

(C) Model, share, and promote ethical and legal principles of education and librarianship; and

(D) Acknowledge the importance of participating on school and district committees and in faculty staff development opportunities.

(b) Articulate the relationship of the library media program with current educational trends and important issues. Candidates:

(A) Recognize the role of other educational professionals and professional associations;

(B) Translate for the school the ways in which the library program can enhance school improvement efforts; and

(C) Use information found in professional journals to improve library practice

(c) Provide and promote learning opportunities for the school community with a focus on information technology, information literacy, and literature appreciation. Candidates:

(A) Are able to articulate the relationship of the library media program with current educational trends and important issues;

(B) Recognize the role of other educational professionals and professional associations;

(C) Translate for the school the ways in which the library program can enhance school improvement efforts; and

(D) Use information found in professional journals to improve library practice.

(6) Administer the library media program in order to support the mission of the school, and according to the principles of best practice in library science and program administration. Candidates must:

(a) Apply leadership, collaboration and technology skills to design and manage a student-centered program that is current, comprehensive, and integrated within the school. Candidates: Develop and evaluate policies and procedures that support the mission of the school and address specific needs of the library media program, such as collection development and maintenance, challenged materials and acceptable use policies.

(b) Ensure their school library programs focus on students' diverse learning an’ achievement. Candidates:

(A) Support intellectual freedom and privacy of users; and

(B) Plan for efficient use of resources and technology to meet diverse user needs.

(c) Adhere to the principles of the school library profession which include selecting, organizing, managing, and developing procedures and policies for print and electronic information resources. Candidates:

(A) Select, analyze, and evaluate print, nonprint and electronic resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop a quality collection designed to meet diverse curricular and personal needs; and

(B) Organize the library media facility and its collections - print, nonprint and–electronic, according to standard accepted practice.

(d) Assess and manage financial, physical, and human resources. Candidates:

(A) Apply accepted management principles and practices that relate to personnel, financial and operational issues; and

(B) Plan adequate space for individuals, small groups and whole classes.

(7) Skill in use of technology. Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate a sound understanding of technology operations and concepts;

(b) Implement curriculum plans that include methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize student learning;

(c) Use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice; and

(d) Understand the social, ethical, and legal issues surrounding the use of technology in schools and apply those principles in practice.

(8) Skill in cultural competency. Candidates must:

(a) Strive to enhance resources, services, programs and instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students, regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability, or other individual characteristics; and

(b) Ensure that staff and students have access to all library resources to assist them in working effectively with those in the school community with different native languages, socioeconomic backgrounds, ethnicities, genders, disabilities, and other individual characteristics.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120-342.143, 342.153, 342.165 & 342.223- 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 5-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-15-07; Renumbered from 584-065-0110 by TSPC 5-2013, f. & cert. ef. 11-14-13

584-018-0110

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Professional Dispositions for Continuing  Professional Teaching Licensure

The unit assures that candidates for a Continuing  Professional Teaching License have sufficient evidence to show a higher level of performances, essential knowledge and critical dispositions in each of the following ten (10) teaching standards than is expected to achieve the Initial I Teaching License found in OAR 584-018-0100.

(1) The Learner and Learning:

(a) Learner Development: The teacher understands how children learns grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences. [InTASC Standard #1]

(b) Learning Differences: The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards. [InTASC Standard #2]

(c) Learning Environments: The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. [InTASC Standard #3]

(2) Content

(a) Content Knowledge: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content. [InTASC Standard #4]

(b) Application of Content: The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues. [InTASC Standard #5]

(3) Instructional Practice

(a) Assessment: The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making. [InTASC Standard #6]

(b) Planning for Instruction: The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills and pedagogy, as well as learners and the community context. [InTASC Standard #7]

(c) Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways. [InTASC Standard #8]

(4) Professional Responsibility

(a) Professional Learning and Ethical Practice: The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his or her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner. [InTASC Standard #9]

(b) Leadership and Collaboration: The teacher demonstrates leadership by taking responsibility for student learning and by collaborating with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth and development, learning, and well-being. [InTASC Standard #10]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0115

Early Childhood Education Authorization

The unit assures that candidates for an Early Childhood Education Authorization demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies in a pre-kindergarten, kindergarten or an elementary setting.

(1) Candidates document understanding and apply knowledge of developmental psychology and learning, appropriate to students ages three through grade four within the cultural and community context of the teacher education institution and cooperating school districts.

(2) Candidates articulate and apply a philosophy of education which is appropriate to the students in pre-kindergarten and elementary grades and which ensures that students learn to think critically and integrate subject matter across disciplines.

(3) Candidates document broad knowledge of the subject matter, curriculum and methods needed to enable students to meet state and district standards by passing the commission-approved multiple subjects examination.

(4) Candidates complete student teaching or internship with students in grades pre-kindergarten through grade four. A field or clinical experience may substitute for student teaching if this is an additional authorization on an Initial, Initial I, Initial II or Continuing  Professional Teaching License.

(5) Special Education candidates may complete field, clinical experience or internships in grades pre-kindergarten through grade four.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0120

Elementary Authorization

The unit assures that candidates for an Elementary (ELE) Authorization demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies in an elementary setting.

(1) Candidates document understanding and apply knowledge of developmental psychology and learning, appropriate to students in grades 3-8 within the cultural and community context of the teacher education institution and cooperating school districts.

(2) Candidates articulate and apply a philosophy of education which is appropriate to the students in elementary grades and which ensures that students learn to think critically and integrate subject matter across disciplines.

(3) Candidates document broad knowledge of the subject matter, curriculum and methods needed to enable students to meet state and district standards by passing the commission-approved multiple subjects examination.

(4) Candidates complete student teaching or internship with students in grades 3-8. A field or clinical experience may substitute for student teaching if this is an additional authorization on an Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License.

(5) Special Education candidates may complete field, clinical experience, or internships in grades three (3) through eight (8).

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0130

High School Authorization

The unit assures that candidates for a High School Authorization demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies in a high school setting.

(1) Candidates document understanding and apply knowledge of developmental psychology and learning, appropriate to students in grades 7-12 within the cultural and community context of the teacher education institution and cooperating school districts.

(2) Candidates articulate and apply a philosophy of education which is appropriate to the students in grades 7-12 and which ensures that students learn to think critically and integrate subject matter across disciplines.

(3) Candidates document in-depth knowledge of one subject matter or specialty area, curriculum, and methods needed to enable students to meet state and district standards by passing the required Commission-approved test or tests in the specific subject area(s).

(4) Candidates holding middle-level endorsements in language arts, social studies or science, are not eligible to teach these subjects on the high school authorization.

(5) Candidates complete student teaching or internship with students in grades 7-12. A field or clinical experience may substitute for student teaching if this is an additional authorization on an Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0140

Adding Authorization Levels to Existing Initial and Continuing  Professional Teaching Licenses

(1) The unit makes provisions for adding authorizations to Initial and Continuing  Professional Teaching Licenses.

(2) A candidate seeking to add the next contiguous authorization to an existing Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License will:

(a) Successfully complete at least six (6) quarter hours or four (4) semester hours of preparation in child or adolescent development, whichever is appropriate for the level being completed. The program will include methods of instruction in the appropriate subjects at the requested authorization level and may include taking additional subject-matter tests to qualify for the authorization level; and

(b) One of the following field or clinical experiences, which must include preparation of one (1) work sample to document teaching effectiveness at the new authorization level:

(A) A field or clinical experience of two (2) semester hours or three (3) quarter hours, which except as specified below may or may not be part of a longer preparation that includes content or methods courses in the subject area, in an institution approved to prepare teachers for that endorsement; or

(B) Verification of one (1) year of experience teaching the new subject-area at least one (1) hour each day or the equivalent on either an optional assignment of ten (10) hours or less or on an approved conditional assignment permit (CAP) as allowed by OAR 584-036-0081.

(3) A candidate may add an authorization level that is not contiguous to an existing Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License if, the candidate successfully completes an approved program at that level. Completion of the approved program shall include the required field or clinical experience and completion of a work sample to document teaching effectiveness at the new authorization level.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

Division 38:  1 rule

584-038-0003

Basic Teaching Licensure Under Superseded Standards

Upon filing a correct and complete application in form and manner prescribed by the commission, a qualified applicant may be granted a Basic Teaching License, issued for three years plus time to the applicant's next birth date an’ renewable under OAR 584-048. Such an applicant must have enrolled in a basic teacher education program under standards superseded by 21st century licensure and be found in the judgment of the commission subject to hardship if issued an initial license instead of a basic license. If the initial license is judged preferable, the applicant will not be required to add course work to the basic program, although institutions may make appropriate substitutions for partial updating. The recipient of a basic license may pursue either a standard license (see OAR 584-040) or a Continuing  Professional license (see OAR 584-060).

(1) General requirements for the Basic Teaching License include:

(a) A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in the United States, or the foreign equivalent of such degree approved by the commission.

(b) Completion in Oregon or another U.S. jurisdiction of a basic teacher education program approved by the commission, or completion of a U.S. or foreign program evaluated as satisfactory by an Oregon institution approved to offer the corresponding program.

(c) A passing score as currently specified by the commission on each of one or more tests of subject mastery for license endorsement, except for tests waived due to special academic preparation satisfactory to the commission together with five years of experience teaching the specialty in a public school or regionally accredited private school in a U.S. jurisdiction.

(d) A passing score as currently specified by the commission on a test of basic verbal and computational skills, unless the applicant held an Oregon educator license before 1985 or has a regionally accredited doctor's degree.

(e) A passing score on a test of knowledge of U.S. and Oregon civil rights laws at the conclusion of a course or workshop approved by the commission.

(2) To be eligible for a Basic Teaching License, an applicant must satisfy a recent experience requirement in one of the following ways during the three-year period immediately preceding application:

(a) Completion of an approved teacher education program; or

(b) Beginning and completion in a public school or regionally accredited private school in a U.S. jurisdiction of at least one academic year as a full-time licensed educator or two consecutive years as a half-time licensed educator on any license appropriate for the assignment, or equivalent experience as in a state or federal school; or

(c) Receipt of 6 semester hours or 9 quarter hours of academic credit, germane to teaching licensure, from a regionally accredited college or university.

(3) To be eligible for a Basic Teaching License, an applicant must furnish fingerprints in the manner prescribed by the commission.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – ORS 342.200
Hist.: TSPC 4-1999, f. & cert. ef. 8-2-99; TSPC 2-2000, f. & cert. ef. 5-15-00

Division 42:  4 rules

584-042-0021

Definitions

(1) "Approved Career and Technical Education Program:" A career and technical education program (CTE), approved by the Oregon Department of Education (ODE).

(2) " Career and Technical Education (CTE) Mentor:" A teacher holding a pre-1965 Five-Year Teaching, Five-Year CTE, CTE II, Basic, Standard, Initial, Initial I, Initial II or Continuing  Professional teaching license who guides and supports a beginning CTE teacher on a CTE I Teaching License with instructional planning and preparation, delivery of classroom instruction, classroom management, assessment of student performance, and professional development. The assigned mentor must be approved by ODE to be a CTE mentor.

(3) "Career and Technical Education Professional Development Plan:" A plan for personal professional growth during the life of the Career and Technical Education I Teaching License and the Career and Technical Education II Teaching License consistent with OAR 584-042-0051 Career and Technical Education Professional Development Plan.

(4) “Regional Coordinator:” An individual hired by a local educational agency or community college and officially recognized by the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to specifically coordinate the ODE approved regional system of Career and Technical Education.

(5) "Instructor Appraisal Committee (IAC):" A committee organized in accordance with OAR 584-042-0022.

(6) “Significant Progress:” Significant progress toward completion of CTE professional development plan requirements means the applicant has made a confirmed commitment in each year the license is held toward completing the CTE professional development plan submitted upon application to TSPC. Significant progress may be evidenced by completion of at least one-third of the requirements contained within the professional development plan. The progress must have been completed within the last year preceding application for renewal.

(7) “Waivers:” A waiver of the work experience or academic requirements for the CTE I Teaching License in accordance with OAR 584-042-0060 Waivers.

(8) "Work Experience:" Planned and coordinated work experience or previous and documented work experience that meets the criteria included in OAR 584-042-0070 Work Experience.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455 – 342.495, 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 2-2010(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 3-5-10 thru 8-31-10; TSPC 4-2010, f. & cert. ef. 7-15-10; TSPC 2-2012, f. & cert. ef. 2-15-12

584-042-0022

Instructor Appraisal Committees

(1) An Instructor Appraisal Committee (IAC) is a group of industry and education experts appointed by a school district with an approved ODE Career and Technical Education program. The IAC is convened to evaluate either CTE licensure or CTE endorsement applicants with regard to their work experience and preparation in a CTE endorsed area. (See OAR 584-042-0044 Career and Technical Education Endorsements.)

(2) The appointed Instructor Appraisal committee must make specific CTE licensure and endorsement recommendations to the Oregon Department of Education and to the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission based on their evaluation of each applicant’s preparation and work experience in a CTE endorsement area.

(3) The Instructor Appraisal Committee is comprised of specific membership depending on whether the applicant comes from business and industry or whether the applicant already holds a TSPC License. In all cases, the IAC must have at least five members. An individual member may represent more than one of the representative areas outlined in subsections (e) through (f) immediately below.

(a) Instructor Appraisal Committees evaluating applicants from business and industry and new to education must have at least two educator representatives on the committee subject to the requirements in subsection (e) below.

(b) Instructor Appraisal Committees evaluating applicants for a CTE endorsement onto a TSPC existing CTE, Basic, Standard, Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License must have at least two business and industry representatives on the committee subject to the requirements in subsection (f) below.

(c) District Administrators: All IACs must have a school district administrator or a director of CTE from the district. The administrator representative is an official member of the IAC.

(d) Ex-Officio: The district may appoint non-voting ex-officio members to the IAC.

(e) Educators: Educator representatives may be from public or private secondary and post-secondary institutions. Educators must possess current and substantial knowledge of pedagogy, instructional practices, assessment practices, classroom management, and educational policy. Secondary representatives must hold a valid TSPC license. Post-secondary representatives should be from the applicant’s endorsement program area. The educator representative(s) is an official member of the IAC.

(f) Business or industry members: Business or industry representatives may be either employers or employees of the business or industry. At least one business or industry representatives must be currently engaged in an occupation related to the career and technical education program endorsement area. The representative must possess current and substantial knowledge of the technical and environmental requirements, and standards of behavior required of the business or industry program. The business or industry representative is an official member of the IAC.

(4) Once appointed, the IAC must select a trained facilitator to operate the IAC during each candidate appraisal process. All facilitators must be approved by the ODE prior to selection. An ODE recognized Regional Coordinator of Career and Technical Education or an appropriate ODE program area specialist may serve as the facilitator. Failure to obtain ODE approval may result in an invalid recommendation and is a basis for determining that the licensure process is incomplete.

(5) The IAC must appoint a chair from the official membership of the committee. The chair may not be an ex-officio member or an appointed facilitator. The chair is responsible to provide the IAC’s rationale for the recommendation and must sign any submitted recommendation for a waiver of academic or work experience to the ODE, prior to application for licensure at TSPC.

(6) The CTE Regional Coordinator and the appropriate ODE program specialist must officially verify the IAC member roster as well as evaluations and recommendations of the IAC prior to application for licensure at TSPC.

(7) The applicant’s proposed professional development plan must be consistent with the CTE I Teaching License (OAR 584-042-0031) requirements if the candidate does not hold an existing CTE, Basic, Standard, Initial or Continuing  Professional teaching license.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430, 342.455-342.495, 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 6-2010, f. & cert. ef. 8-31-10

 

584-042-0044

Career and Technical Education Endorsements

(1) Career and Technical Education (CTE) Endorsements are subject-matter endorsements in the career and technical fields.

(2) Only the Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional or CTE II Teaching Licenses are eligible to hold any CTE endorsement. A CTE I Teaching License may only hold a single CTE endorsement.

(3) Endorsements indicate the scope of the subject-matter that may be taught on the license which holds the endorsement. Specific courses allowed within the scope of each endorsement are identified by TSPC and published on the TSPC web site. Endorsements include the following:

(a) Endorsements in the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource Systems area include:

(A) Agriculture Science and Technology;

(B) Natural Resources Management; and

(C) Environmental Services.

(b) Endorsements in the Arts, Information and Communications area include:

(A) Publishing and Broadcasting;

(B) Information and Communications Technology; and

(C) Visual, Performing and Media Arts.

(c) Endorsements in the Business and Management area include:

(A) Business Management and Administration;

(B) Finance;

(C) Hospitality and Tourism;

(D) Information and Communications Technology; and

(E) Marketing.

(d) Endorsements in the Health Sciences area include: Health Sciences.

(e) Endorsements in the Human Resources area include:

(A) Education and Related Fields;

(B) Hospitality and Tourism (Culinary);

(C) Human Services; and

(D) Public Services.

(f) Endorsements in the Industrial and Engineering Systems area include:

(A) Construction Technology;

(B) Engineering Technology;

(C) Information and Communications Technology;

(D) Transportation Technology; and

(E) Manufacturing Technology.

(4) Applicants for the CTE I Teaching License may be limited with regard to the courses they may teach in the first three years of licensure. The IAC will determine whether the applicant is fully prepared to teach all courses with the endorsement area in which the applicant seeks licensure.

(5) All CTE II Teaching License holders are eligible to teach within the full scope of the CTE endorsement.

(6) Adding a CTE Endorsement with Work Experience. Holders of Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional or CTE II teaching licenses who meet all of the ODE-approved work experience requirements for a CTE II Teaching License may be eligible to add CTE endorsements onto their underlying teaching license. The endorsement shall be valid for the same amount of time as the underlying license. Only ODE may approve work experience under this subsection.

(7) Adding a CTE Endorsement without Work Experience. Holders of Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional or CTE II teaching licenses who do not meet the work experience requirements to add a CTE endorsement must apply for a CTE I Teaching License in that endorsement area. Upon verification of the work experience requirements in an application to TSPC, the endorsement may be added to the holder’s Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional Teaching, or CTE II License.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - –42.495, 342.553
H–st.: TSPC 2-2010(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 3-5-10 thru 8-31-10; TSPC 4-2010, f. & cert. ef. 7-15-10; TSPC 5-2010(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-13-10 thru 12-31-10; TSPC 9-2010, f. 12-15-10, cert. ef. 1-1-11; TSPC 2-2012, f. & cert. ef. 2-15-12

584-042-0051

Career and Technical Education (CTE) Professional Development Plan

(1) A CTE professional development plan (PDP) is required as part of the application for the Career and Technical Education I Teaching License. The CTE professional development plan must be for at least three years.

(2) The CTE professional development plan must be signed by both the district and the prospective educator. The employing school district will keep a copy of the CTE professional development plan.

(3) A signed copy of the plan must be included in the CTE I Teaching License application materials submitted to the Commission.

(4) The plan must include assurances that the district has assigned an appropriately licensed administrator to monitor the progress and timely completion of the signed CTE professional development plan. The administrator must be identified in the application materials for the CTE I Teaching License.

(5) The plan must include assurances that the district has assigned an appropriately trained mentor consistent with 584-042-0021(6) and such mentor is identified in the application materials.

(6) For applicants holding a pre-1965 Five-Year Teaching, Basic, Standard, Initial, Initial I, Initial II, Continuing  Professional, or an equivalent out-of-state non-provisional teaching license prior to applying for the Career and Technical Education I Teaching License; the scope of the PDP must include:

(a) Activities identified by the Instructional Appraisal Committee (IAC) that address relevant CTE professional development needs, including verifiable work experience, and coursework that specifically relates to career and technical education; and

(b) Verifiable work experience that has been performed in the last five (5) years and includes one of the following:

(A) At least 1800 hours of previous and documented related work as defined in OAR 584-042-0070(1) CTE Work Experience;

(B) At least 600 hours of planned and coordinated related work experience as defined in OAR 584-042-0070(2) CTE Work Experience;

(C) The equivalent combination of planned and coordinated and previous and documented related work at a technical skill level within the last five years; or

(D) Related industry certification or licensure.

(7) For applicants who have not previously completed a teacher preparation program, the CTE professional development plan must outline how the applicant will acquire a minimum of eighteen (18) quarter hours or twelve (12) semester hours, as specified below, of teacher preparation required for eligibility for a Career and Technical Education II Teaching License. The Instructor Appraisal Committee may increase the requirements if they deem the additional education is necessary. Applicants under this subsection must meet all of the following requirements in subsections (a) through (d).

(a) Obtain nine (9) quarter hours or six (6) semester hours of education-specific coursework which must be selected from the following areas:

(A) Introduction to Career and Technical Education in Oregon;

(B) Introduction to the Education Profession;

(C) Oregon School Law including a focus on special needs students;

(D) Classroom Management;

(E) Multi-cultural Education;

(F) Second Language Acquisition;

(G) Human Development for adolescent and older children;

(H) Education Psychology and Learning Development; and

(b) Obtain at least three (3) quarter hours or two (2) semester hours in Curriculum Design, Instructional Strategies and Assessment; and

(c) Obtain at least three (3) quarter hours or two (2) semester hours in instructional methodology in how to teach mathematics to secondary learners, which may include coursework focused on how to teach mathematics in the CTE context; and

(d) Obtain at least three (3) quarter hours or two (2) semester hours in instructional methodology in how to teach reading, or writing and literacy to secondary learners.

(8) In addition to the requirements in subsections (6) and (7) above, all applicants, regardless if they are coming from education or industry, must show evidence they have at one time obtained or will obtain all of the following specific college-level coursework:

(a) Three (3) quarter hours or two (2) semester hours of math at or above a level required by the industry related to the applicant’s endorsement and identified by the IAC; and

(b) Three (3) quarter hours or two (2) semester hours of college level language arts or speech at the one-hundred level or higher as identified by the IAC.

(9) The IAC may increase the minimum requirements described in subsection (8) above if they deem additional education is needed.

(10) Coursework as required by the Instructor Appraisal Committee must be attained through a TSPC-approved teacher education program or an accredited community college and verified by transcripts submitted to TSPC at the time of application for a Career and Technical Education II License. If in doubt whether the coursework will apply, check with TSPC prior to enrolling in coursework to fulfill these requirements.

(11) Professional Development Plans may be modified after initial development and submission to TSPC with written approval by ODE. Modified plans must be submitted to TSPC with ODE’s approval prior to the expiration of the CTE I Teaching License.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455 –342.496; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 6-2010, f. & cert. ef. 8-31-10; TSPC 2-2012, f. & cert. ef. 2-15-12

 

 

Division 50:  1 rule

584-050-0021

Reinstatement of Right to Apply for a License Following Revocation of a Provisional License

(1) Educators who are only eligible for a provisional license upon application for reinstatement or who have had a provisional license revoked and are applying for a right to apply for a non-provisional license, will be applying for reinstatement of the “right to apply” for any TSPC license whether the revocation order expressly stated the Commission revoked the educator’s “right to apply”.

(2) Non-Provisional Licenses or certificates include any pre-1965 Five-Year, Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing, Professional, Nursing Certificate or Career and Technical Education II license.

(3) Provisional licenses, certificates or registrations include but are not limited to any: Emergency, Limited, Restricted Transitional, Charter School Registry, International Visiting Teaching, NCLB Alternative Route, Career and Technical Education License, except as noted in subsection (2) above, Transitional and Substitute licenses.

(4) Application for reinstatement of the right to apply for any license, certificate or registration revoked for any reason other than those cited in ORS 342.143(3) may be submitted at any time after the period of revocation has expired.

(5) The burden will be on the educator to establish fitness for reinstatement.

(6) The application for reinstatement must include:

(a) A C-1 application form;

(b) A fee pursuant to OAR 584-036-0055;

(c) A personal notarized affidavit attesting that:

(A) All the conditions of the order for revocation have been met; and

(B) That the educator has not violated any laws of the states, including ethical violations related to licensure, certificate or registration; and

(d) Any additional documentation, sufficient to establish convincingly that the educator possesses all of the qualifications required for first licensure or reinstatement of a license, certificate or registration. Letters of recommendations from educator colleagues are insufficient alone to establish fitness for licensure following a revocation. The educator must be clear regarding what proactive steps have been taken to ensure to the Commission that the conduct that resulted in the revocation is highly unlikely to occur again.

(7) Following review of the application for reinstatement pursuant to this section, the Executive Director may make a recommendation to the Commission regarding whether to approve or deny the application.

(8) All decisions to reinstate a revoked right to apply for a license, certificate, or registration under this rule or will be made by the Commission in executive session.

(9) The Executive Director or the Commission may require the educator to appear before the Commission in executive session prior to consideration of the application for reinstatement.

(a) It is entirely at the Commission’s discretion whether an educator may meet with the Commission under these circumstances.

(b) This subsection does not grant a right to any applicant to appear before the Commission prior to the Commission’s consideration of the application for reinstatement following a revocation.

(10) If the Commission denies the application for reinstatement, or the right to apply for a license, certificate or registration, the Executive Director will mail a copy of the recommendation of denial to the educator and a notice of right to a hearing under ORS 342.175.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 181 & 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 181.525, 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - –42.495 & 342.553
–ist.: TSPC 4-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12

Division 52:  1 rule

584-052-0027

Waiver of Academic or Experience Requirements by the Commission

(1) The Executive Director may substitute successful teaching, personnel service, or administrative experience to satisfy minimal requirements for formal college preparation or public school experience required in the rules for licensure. Experience acceptable for substitution for minimal requirements shall be such that the applicant has developed skills and knowledge comparable to that developed through approved program preparation. To be granted a basic, standard, initial or Continuing, Professional license, a candidate shall have clearly demonstrated ability to perform the duties of the position.

(2) The Commission shall monitor any waivers granted under section (1) of this rule and shall receive reports on such waivers.

(3) Applicants requesting licensure based on substitution of successful teaching, personnel service, or administrative experience to satisfy licensure requirements shall submit the following materials:

(a) Application form, evaluation fee, and supporting materials;

(b) A written statement from the applicant including type of license requested, requirements and qualifications to be considered, supportive information, and plans for professional growth;

(c) If applicable, written statements from supervisors in the employing school district indicating support for the substitution and the particular competency of the candidate in relationship to identified district and student needs; and

(d) The applicant's resume and a statement indicating reasons for referring the matter to the Executive Director.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430 & 342.985
Hist.: TS 15, f. 12-20-76, ef. 1-1-77; TS 17, f. 12-19-77, ef. 1-1-78; TS 6-1980, 0f. & ef. 12-23-80; Renumbered from 584-052-025; TS 1-1982, f. & ef. 1-5-82; TS 7-1986, f. 10-15-86, ef. 1-15-87; TS 6-1991, f. & cert. ef. 3-12-91; TS 1-1992, f. & cert. ef. 1-15-92; TS 6-1992(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 10-1-92; TS 3-1993, f. & cert. ef. 4-19-93; TS 7-1994, f. 9-29-94, cert. ef. 1-15-95; TS 3-1997, f. & cert. ef. 9-22-97; TS 4-1997, f. 9-25-97, cert. ef. 10-4-97; TSPC 3-1998(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 3-25-98 thru 9-8-98; Administrative correction 8-9-99; TSPC 2-2000, f. & cert. ef. 5-15-00; TSPC 2-2009, f. & cert. ef. 3-12-09

 

Division 60:  3 rules

584-060-0052

Adding Authorization Levels to Existing Initial and Continuing  Professional Teaching Licenses

(1) A candidate seeking to add the next contiguous authorization level to an existing Initial or Professional Teaching License will complete the following:

(a) A program of at least six (6) quarter hours or four (4) semester hours of preparation in child or adolescent development, whichever is appropriate for the level being completed. The program will include methods of instruction in the appropriate subjects at the requested authorization level and may include taking additional subject-matter tests to qualify for the authorization level. Verification from the institution at which the program is completed is required to add the authorization; and

(b) One of the following practicum experiences, which must include preparation of one (1) work sample to document teaching effectiveness at the new authorization level:

(A) A practicum of two (2) semester hours or three (3) quarter hours, which except as specified below may or may not be part of a longer preparation that includes content or methods courses in the subject area, in an institution approved to prepare teachers for that endorsement; or

(B) Verification of one (1) year of experience teaching the new subject-area at least one (1) hour each day or the equivalent on either an optional assignment of ten (10) hours or less or on an approved License for Conditional Assignment.

(2) A candidate may add an authorization level that is not contiguous to an existing Initial or Professional Teaching License if:

(a) The candidate successfully completes an approved program at that level; and

(b) The completed program includes the required practicum experience and completion of a work sample to document teaching effectiveness at the new authorization level.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.153, 3–2.165, 342.223 - 342.232
Hist.: TSP– 3-2005(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05 thru 9-30-05; TSPC 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 8-24-05; TSPC 9-2006, f. & cert. ef. 6-15-06; TSPC 2-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-08; TSPC 4-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 11-14-13 thru 5-13-14; TSPC 2-2014, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-14

584-060-0062

Adding Endorsements to Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching Licenses

(1) An endorsement is the subject matter or specialty education field in which the educator is licensed to teach. Educators may only teach the subjects in which they are licensed in the grade levels authorized on the license (authorization level).

(2) A multiple subjects self-contained endorsement does not allow the teacher to teach: Adaptive Physical Education, Art, Communications Disorders, Early Intervention/Special Education, ESOL, ESOL/Bilingual, Hearing Impaired, Library Media, Music, Physical Education, Reading Specialist, Special Education, or Vision Impaired.

(3) Subject-Matter Competency: A new endorsement will be added to a new or existing Initial I, Initial II or Professional Teaching License upon documentation of one of the following: (For Middle-Level Endorsement exceptions see subsection (5) below.)

(a) For endorsements where subject-matter mastery tests are required by the commission,

(b) For the endorsements where the commission has not approved subject-matter mastery tests including but not limited to: Drama, Japanese, Latin, Chinese, Russian, and Adaptive Physical Education:

(A) Completion of a program or demonstrated completion of required coursework; or

(B) A non-provisional out-of-state license showing endorsement in the subject-area.

(c) Special Exception for Out-of-State Applicants: For out-of-state applicants upon first licensure in Oregon. (See OAR 584-036-0080 Licensure Tests.)

(4) Practicum Requirements: In addition to the requirements in subsection (3)(a) and (b) of this rule, one of the following practical experiences must be completed:

(a) A program-supervised practicum of two semester hours or three quarter hours, which except as specified below may or may not be part of a longer preparation that includes content or methods courses in the subject area, in an institution approved to prepare teachers for that endorsement;

(b) Verification of 60 hours or more of experience teaching the new subject-area at least one hour each day or the equivalent on either an optional assignment of ten hours or less or an approved License for Conditional Assignment (LCA) as allowed by OAR 584-060-0250; or

(c) Completion of an approved program in the new subject-matter endorsement area.

(5) Adding Endorsements to the Middle-Level (ML) Authorization Level:

(a) Teachers holding an Initial, Initial I, Initial II, or Professional Teaching License with a multiple subjects self-contained or a multiple subjects endorsement with either an elementary or middle-level authorization are not required to complete an additional subject-related practicum to add the endorsements specified in this subsection.

(b) To add the endorsements listed below, teachers qualifying under this section must pass the Commission-approved high school or middle school test or tests in the appropriate subject-matter area:

(A) Language Arts or middle-school Language Arts;

(B) Social Studies or middle-school Social Studies;

(C) Science or middle school science; or

(D) Basic or Advanced Math.

(c) A multiple subjects endorsement is also required to add all general education endorsements at the middle-level authorization except the following specialty endorsements:

(A) Adaptive Physical Education

(B) Art;

(C) ESOL;

(D) ESOL/Bilingual;

(E) Library Media Specialist;

(F) Music;

(G) Physical Education;

(H) Reading; and

(I) Special Education;

(J) Vision Impaired;

(K) Hearing Impaired;

(L) Communications Disorders;

(M) Early Intervention/Special Education.

(6) Grade Authorization Level: Some endorsement areas may require the completion of a new authorization level program prior to being added to the license. The applicant should obtain a check sheet of requirements from TSPC prior to pursing adding a new endorsement to an existing license. (See, OAR 584-060-0052 Adding Authorization Levels to Existing Initial and Professional Teaching Licenses.)

(7) When Programs are required:

(a) An approved program including content courses, methods courses, and practica is always required as preparation for added endorsement in the following areas:

(A) All Special Education endorsements, including:

(i) Early Intervention/Special Education;

(ii) Hearing Impairment;

(iii)Vision Impairment;

(iv) Special Education; and

(v) Communication Disorders;

(B) English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL);

(C) Reading; or

(D) Subjects for which no subject mastery test has been required by the Commission for endorsement including but not limited to:

(i) Drama;

(ii) Japanese;

(iii) Latin;

(iv) Chinese;

(v) Russian; and

(vi) Adaptive Physical Education.

(b) Program evaluations for waiver of the subject matter test for out-of-state applicants requesting these endorsements must align with the requirements in division 38;

(c) Adding a Multiple Subjects or other General Education Endorsement to a License with Only a Specialty Endorsement: To add any general education endorsement to a license that holds a “specialty endorsement” only requires the following:

(A) Evidence of completion of a general education program at the grade levels at which the general education endorsement is sought; or

(B) A recommendation by C-2 form by an Oregon program approved to offer the endorsement.

(8) Specialty Endorsements: Adding specialty endorsements such as art, music, ESOL, ESOL/bilingual, reading, physical education, and library media specialists may involve additional course work. (See, OAR 584-060-0071 Endorsements Requiring Special Preparation.)

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 –342.430; 342.455 – 342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2005(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05 thru 9-30-05; TSPC 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 8-24-05; TSPC 2-2007, f. & cert. ef. 4-23-07; TSPC 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 8-20-08; TSPC 4-2009, f. & cert. ef. 9-22-09; TSPC 2-2011, f. & cert. ef. 1-28-11; TSPC 6-2011, f. 8-15-11, cert. ef. 9-1-11; TSPC 4-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12; TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13; TSPC 5-2014, f. & cert. ef. 8-5-14

584-060-0181

Substitute Teaching License

(1) Upon filing a correct and complete application in form and manner prescribed by the Commission, a qualified applicant may be granted a Substitute Teaching License. This license, issued for three years and renewable, is valid at any level in any specialty to substitute for a teacher who is temporarily unable to work.

(2) To be eligible for a Substitute Teaching License, the applicant must:

(a) Hold a bachelor's degree or higher from a regionally-accredited institution in the United States, or the foreign equivalent of such degree approved by the Commission. A master’s degree or a doctoral degree from a regionally-accredited institution in the United States validates a non-regionally accredited bachelor's degree for licensure;

(b) Hold an unrestricted license for full-time teaching in any state demonstrating completion of a state-approved teacher education program;

(c) Obtain a passing score on a Commission-adopted test of knowledge of U.S. and Oregon civil rights and professional ethics;

(d) Furnish fingerprints in the manner prescribed by the Commission if the applicant has not been fingerprinted or has not held an active license issued by the Commission in the past three years; and

(e) Provide continuing professional development if transitioning from a basic, standard, initial or Continuing  Professional teaching license to a Substitute Teaching License.

(3) The holder of a Substitute Teaching License may not continuously replace an individual teacher absent for more than three consecutive months without obtaining a full-time license. Failure to observe this limitation may result in licensure sanction by the Commission for either the teacher or the assigning administrator or both.

(4) A district and co-applicant educator may apply for an Emergency Teaching License for the holder of a Substitute Teaching License if the district is unable to obtain a regularly-licensed teacher for any position lasting more than three consecutive months. The Emergency Teaching License will allow the educator to teach for time beyond the allowed timelines stated in subsection (3) above. The Executive Director may approve the Emergency Teaching License upon proof of the district’s emergency and may only issue the license for the amount of time to cover the emergency. In all cases, the Emergency Teaching License may not extend beyond the end of that school year.

(5) To be eligible for renewal of the Substitute Teaching License an applicant must show:

(a) Evidence of having obtained a passing score as currently specified by the Commission on a test of basic verbal and computational skills, unless the applicant held an Oregon educator license before 1985 or has a regionally-accredited master’s degree; and

(b) Completion of continuing professional development in accordance with OAR 584-090.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - –42.495 & 342.533
Hist.: TSPC 3-1999, f. & cert. ef. 7-15-99; TSPC 9-1999, f. & cert. ef. 11-22-99; TSPC 5-2004, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-04; TSPC 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 8-20-08; TSPC 2-2009, f. & cert. ef. 3-12-09; TSPC 8-2009, f. & cert. ef. 12-15-09; TSPC 5-2010(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-13-10 thru 12-31-10; TSPC 9-2010, f. 12-15-10, cert. ef. 1-1-11; TSPC 3-2011, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-11; TSPC 5-2013, f. & cert. ef. 11-14-13

Division 65: 6 rules

584-065-0120

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Early Childhood Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved multiple subjects examination required for early childhood education authorization, candidates must complete the required practicum experience with students in one or more age groups or grades between age three and grade four.

(2) Teachers who hold an Initial, Initial I or Initial II or Continuing  Professional Teaching License with an elementary authorization may add the early childhood authorization level only upon enrollment in an early childhood authorization program approved by TSPC. [See, OAR 584-060-0051.]

(3) In order to promote child development and learning, the candidate must:

(a) Know and understand young children's characteristics an’ needs;

(b) Know and understand the multiple influences on development and learning; and

(c) Use developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments.

(4) In order to build family and community relationships, the candidate must:

(a) Know about and understand family and community characteristics;

(b) Support and empower families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships; and

(c) Involve families and communities in their children's development and learning.

(5) In order to document and assess the learning of young children, the candidate will:

(a) Understand the goals, benefits and uses of assessment;

(b) Know about and use observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches to inform instruction;

(c) Understand and practice appropriate assessment;

(d) Develop partnerships with families and other professionals to assess children's strengths and need’; and

(e) Understand and practice appropriate assessment for all children including culturally and linguistically diverse children as well as children with exceptionalities.

(6) In order to demonstrate teaching and learning, the candidate will:

(a) Connect with children and families to create positive learning environments; and

(b) Use developmentally effective approaches:

(A) Foster oral language and communication;

(B) Draw from continuum of teaching strategies;

(C) Make the most of the environment and routines;

(D) Capitalize on incidental teaching;

(E) Focus on children's characteristics, needs, and interests;

(F) Link children's language and culture to the early childhood program;

(G) Teach through social interactions;

(H) Create support for play;

(I) Address children's challenging behaviors;

(J) Use integrative approaches to curriculum; and

(c) Demonstrate an understanding of content knowledge in early education, the candidate will create a classroom environment that encompasses the following core content objectives:

(A) In language and literacy, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Explore their environments and develop the conceptual, experiential, and language foundations for learning to read and write;

(ii) Develop their ability to converse at length and in depth on a topic in various settings (one-on-one with adults and peers, in small groups, etc.);

(iii) Develop vocabulary that reflects their growing knowledge of the world around them;

(iv) Use language, reading and writing to strengthen their own cultural identify as well as to participate in the shared identity of the school environment;

(v) Associate reading and writing with pleasure and enjoyment as well as with skill development;

(vi) Use a range of strategies to derive meaning from stories and texts;

(vii) Use language, reading, and writing for various purposes;

(viii) Use a variety of print and non-print resources;

(ix) Develop basic concepts of print and understanding of sounds, letters, and letter sound relationships; and

(B) In the Arts: music, creative movement, dance, drama, and art, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Interact musically with others;

(ii) Express and interpret understandings of their world through structured and informal musical play;

(iii) Sing, play, and create music;

(iv) Respond to expressive characteristics of music-rhythm, melody, form-through speaking, singing, moving, and playing simple instruments;

(v) Use music to express emotions, conflicts, and needs;

(vi) Move expressively to music of various tempos, meters, modes, genres, and cultures to express what they feel and hear;

(vii) Understand and apply artistic media, techniques, and processes;

(viii) Make connections between visual arts and other disciplines; and

(C) In Mathematics, candidates will develop curriculum in alignment with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) curriculum student or K-12 grade, recognizing the quantitative dimensions of children's learning:

(i) Mathematics as problem solving;

(ii) Mathematics as communication;

(iii) Mathematics as reasoning;

(iv) Mathematical connections;

(v) Estimation;

(vi) Number sense and numeration;

(vii) Concepts of whole number operations;

(viii) Whole number computation;

(ix) Geometry and spatial sense;

(x) Measurement;

(xi) Statistics and probability;

(xii) Fractions and decimals;

(xiii) Patterns and relationships; and

(D) In physical activity and Physical Education, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Have varied, repeated experiences with functional movement and manipulation;

(ii) Demonstrate progress toward mature forms of selected physical skills;

(iii) Try new movement activities and skills;

(iv) Use feedback to improve performance;

(v) Experience and express pleasure from participation in physical activity;

(vi) Apply rules, procedures, and safe practices;

(vii) Gain competence to provide increased enjoyment in movement; and

(E) In Science, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Explore materials, objects and events by acting upon them and noticing what happens;

(ii) Make careful observations of objects, organisms, and events using all their senses;

(iii) Describe, compare, sort, classify, and order in terms of observable characteristics;

(iv) Use a variety of simple tools to extend their observations;

(v) Engage in simple investigations including making predictions, gathering and interpreting data, recognizing simple patterns, and drawing conclusions;

(vi) Record observations, explanations, and ideas through multiple forms of representation;

(vii) Work collaboratively with others, share and discuss ideas, and listen to new perspectives; and

(F) In Social Studies, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Geography:

(ii) Make and use maps to locate themselves in space

(iii) Observe the physical characteristics of the places in which they live and identify landforms, bodies of water, climate, soils, natural vegetation and animal life of that place; and

(iv) History:

(v) Use the methods of the historian, identifying questions, locating and analyzing information, and reaching conclusions;

(vi) Record and discuss the changes that occur in their lives, recalling their immediate past; and

(vii) Economics:

(I) Develop awareness of the difference between wants and needs;

(II) Develop interest in the economic system, understanding the contributions of those who produce goods and services; and

(iv) Social relations/civics:

(I) Become a participating member of the group, giving up some individuality for the greater good;

(II) Recognizing similarities among people of many cultures;

(III) Respecting others, including those who differ in gender, ethnicity, ability or ideas;

(IV) Learn the principles of democracy, working cooperatively with others, sharing and voting as they solve problems; and

(d) In order to build meaningful curriculum, the candidate will:

(A) Know, understand, and use positive relationships and supportive interactions;

(B) Know, understand, and use effective approaches, strategies, and tools for early education;

(C) Know and understand the importance, central concepts, inquiry tools, curriculum integration, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines; and

(D) Know and use differentiated instructional strategies to promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students, regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics.

(7) In demonstrating professionalism, the candidate will:

(a) Identify and involve oneself with the early childhood field;

(b) Know about and uphold ethical standard and other professional guidelines (see National Association for the Education for Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethical Conduct);

(c) Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice;

(d) Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education; and

(e) Engage in informed advocacy for children and the profession.

(8) Valid for any teaching assignment, except specialization requiring endorsement under OAR 584-060-0071, at or below grade four.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.165
Hist.: TSPC–5-2008, f. & cert. ef. 6-13-08

584-065-0001

Purpose of Endorsements for Initial and Continuing  Professional Teacher Licenses

(1) These rules establish endorsement requirements for Initial and Continuing  Professional Teacher Licenses. The use of this rule includes, but is not limited to, the following:

(a) Advising Oregon Teacher Education Institutions of academic requirements for endorsements under divisions 60, 70 and 80;

(b) Assessing the preparation of out-of-state applicants who make application for Oregon licensure; and

(c) Guiding in the selection and use of licensure tests in the respective endorsements.

(2) Teachers holding Basic or Standard Licenses are endorsed under requirements stated in divisions 38 and 40.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented:
ORS 342.120 – 342.143, 342.153, RS 342.165, & 342.223 – 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 5-1998, f. 6-5-98, cert. ef. 1-15-99

584-065-0060

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Physical Education Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for physical education and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add a physical education endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License. The requirements to add a physical education endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at: OAR 584-038-0230 and 584-040-0210.

(2) Demonstrated Content Knowledge. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of physical education content, disciplinary concepts, and tools of inquiry related to the development of a physically educated person. Candidates must:

(a) Identify critical elements of motor skill performance, and combine motor skills into appropriate sequences for the purpose of improving learning;

(b) Demonstrate competent motor skill performance in a variety of physical activities;

(c) Describe performance concepts and strategies related to a skillful movement and physical activity such as: fitness principles, game tactics, skill improvement principles;

(d) Describe and apply: anatomical, physiological and biomechanical bioscience and psychological concepts to skillful movement, physical activity and fitness;

(e) Understand and debate current physical education and activity issues and laws based on historical, philosophical and sociological concepts; and

(f) Demonstrate knowledge of national and state content standards and local programs goals.

(3) Demonstrated Knowledge of Growth and Development. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of how individuals learn and develop, and can provide opportunities that support their physical, cognitive, social and emotional development. Candidates must:

(a) Monitor individual and group performance in order to design safe instruction that meets student development needs in the physical, cognitive and social and emotional domains;

(b) Understand the biological, psychological, sociological, experiential and environmental factors such as: neurological development, physique, gender and socio-economic status that impact developmental readiness to learn and demonstrate the ability to refine movement skills accordingly; and

(c) Identify, select and implement appropriate learning and best practices opportunities based on understanding the student, the learning environment and the task.

(4) Demonstrated Ability to Differentiate Instruction. Candidates demonstrate competencies in differentiated instruction for diverse learners by demonstrating an understanding of how individuals differ in their approaches to learning and create appropriate instruction opportunities adapted to individual differences. Candidates must:

(a) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students’ strengths and weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(b) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction to ensure success for all students.

(5) Demonstrated Competency in Classroom Management and Individual and Group Motivation. Candidate demonstrates ability to understand individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-motivation. Candidates must:

(a) Use managerial routines that create smoothly functioning learning experiences and environments;

(b) Organize, allocate, and manage resources such as students, time, space, equipment, activities and teacher attention;

(c) Use a variety of developmentally appropriate practices to motivate students to participate in physical activity inside and outside the school;

(d) Use strategies to help students demonstrate responsible personal and social behaviors such as mutual respect, support for others, safety and cooperation that promote positive relationships and a productive learning environment; and

(e) Develop effective behavior management plans when appropriate.

(6) Demonstrate Competency in Communication. Candidates demonstrate skill and knowledge in the use of effective verbal, nonverbal and media communication techniques to foster inquiry, collaboration and engagement in physical activity settings. Candidates must:

(a) Describe and demonstrate effective communication skills, such as: use of language, clarity, conciseness, pacing, giving and receiving, feedback, age appropriate language and non-verbal communication;

(b) Communicate managerial and instructional information in a variety of ways such as bulletin boards, music, task cards, posters, Internet and video;

(c) Communicate in ways that demonstrate sensitivity and consideration of ethnic, cultural, socio-economic, ability and gender differences; and

(d) Describe and implement strategies to enhance communication and collaboration among students in physical activity settings.

(7) Demonstrate Competency in Planning and Instruction. The candidate demonstrates skill in planning and implements a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies to develop physically educated individuals. Candidates must:

(a) Identify, develop and implement appropriate program and instructional goals;

(b) Develop long and short-term plans that are linked to both programs, instructional goals and student needs;

(c) Select and implement instructional strategies, based on selected content, student needs and safety issues, to facilitate learning in the physical activity setting;

(d) Design and implement learning experiences that are safe, appropriate, relevant and based on principles of effective instruction;

(e) Apply disciplinary and pedagogical knowledge in developing and implementing effective learning environments and experiences;

(f) Provide learning experiences that allow students to integrate knowledge and skills from multiple subject areas;

(g) Select and implement appropriate, comprehensive, accurate, useful and safe teaching resources and curriculum materials;

(h) Use effective demonstrations and explanations to link physical activity concepts to appropriate learning experiences;

(i) Develop and use appropriate instructional cues and prompts to facilitate competent motor skills performance; and

(j) Develop a repertoire of direct and indirect instructional formats to facilitate student learning such as ask questions, pose scenarios, promote problem-solving and critical thinking; facilitate factual recall and promote literacy.

(8) Demonstrate Competencies in Learner Assessment. The candidate demonstrates an understanding and use of formal and informal assessment strategies to foster physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of learners in physical activity. Candidates must:

(a) Identify key component of various types of assessment, describe their appropriate and inappropriate use and address issues of validity, reliability and adverse impact;

(b) Use a variety of appropriate authentic and traditional assessment techniques, including both self and peer assessments, to assess student understanding and performance, provide feedback and communicate student progress for both formative and summative purposes; and

(c) Interpret and use learning and performance data to make informed curricular and instructional decisions.

(9) Demonstrate Competency in the Ability to Reflect and Make Appropriate Adjustments in Teaching Quality. Candidates demonstrate the ability to reflect and evaluate the effects of her or his actions on others. Candidates must:

(a) Use a reflective cycle involving description of teaching, justification of teaching performance, critique of the teaching performance, the setting of teaching goals and implementation of change;

(b) Use available resources such as colleagues, literature and professional associations to develop as a reflective physical educator; and

(c) Construct a plan for continued professional growth based on the assessment of personal teaching performance.

(10) Demonstrate Competency in Technology. Candidates use information technology to enhance learning and to enhance personal and professional productivity. Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate knowledge of current technologies and their application in physical education;

(b) Design, develop and implement student learning activities that integrate information technology; and

(c) Use technologies to communicate, network, locate resources and enhance continuing professional development.

(11) Demonstrate Competency to Foster Collaboration. Candidates will foster relationships with colleagues, parents and guardians and community agencies to support learners’ growth and well-being. Candidates will:

(a) Identify strategies to become an advocate in the school and community to promote a variety of physical activity opportunities;

(b) Actively participate in the local, state and national professional physical education community and within the broader education field;

(c) Identify and actively seek community resources to enhance physical activity opportunities; and

(d) Pursue productive relationships with parents, guardians and school colleagues to support student growth and well-being.

(12) Candidates for physical education endorsement must be authorized at one paired authorization level as defined in OAR 584-060-0071 in any one of the following combinations below. Candidates completing a practica experience at either early childhood or elementary and at either middle or high school levels shall qualify for authorization to teach preprimary through grade 12. Paired authorizations may be:

(a) Early Childhood and Elementary;

(b) Elementary and Middle Level; or

(c) Middle Level and High School.

(13) This endorsement is valid to teach:

(a) Games and sports skills;

(b) Gymnastics;

(c) Movement;

(d) Personal and Social Development;

(e) Physical Fitness and Body Development;

(f) Rhythms;

(g) Adaptive motor skills; and

(h) Athletic training.

(14) This endorsement is required for teaching any subject in subsection (13) above:

(a) More than 51% on a Basic or Standard Teaching License with an elementary endorsement; or

(b) More than 10 hours per week on:

(A) Any Basic or Standard Teaching License with other than an elementary endorsement; or

(B) An Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License at any grade authorization level.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.143, 342.153, 342.165 & 342.173
Hist.: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05; TSPC 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 10-5-09

584-065-0070

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Health Education Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for health education and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add a health education endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License. The requirements to add a health education endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at: OAR 584-038-0110 and 584-040-0100.

(2) Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs for Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Obtain health-related data about social and cultural environments, growth and development factors, needs, and interests of students;

(b) Distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being; and

(c) Candidates determine health education needs based on observed and obtained data.

(3) Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Recruit school and community representatives to support and assist in program planning;

(b) Develop a logical scope and sequence plan for a health education program;

(c) Formulate appropriate and measurable learner objectives; and

(d) Design educational strategies consistent with specified learner objectives.

(4) Candidates Implement Health Education Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Analyze factors affecting the successful implementation of health education and Coordinated School Health Programs (CSHPs);

(b) Select resources and media best suited to implement program plans for diverse learners;

(c) Exhibit competence in carrying out planned programs; and

(d) Monitor educational programs, adjusting objectives and instructional strategies as necessary.

(5) Candidates Evaluate the Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Develop plans to assess student achievement of program objectives;

(b) Carry out evaluation plans;

(c) Interpret results of program evaluation; and

(d) Infer implications of evaluation findings for future program planning.

(6) Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services. Candidates will:

(a) Develop a plan for coordinating health education with other components of a school health program;

(b) Demonstrate the dispositions and skills to facilitate cooperation among health educators, other teachers, and appropriate school staff;

(c) Candidates formulate practical modes of collaboration among health educators in all settings and other school and community health professionals; and

(d) Candidates organize professional development programs for teachers, other school personnel, community members, and other interested individuals.

(7) Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Utilize computerized health information retrieval systems effectively;

(b) Establish effective consultative relationships with those requesting assistance in solving health-related problems;

(c) Interpret and respond to requests for health information; and

(d) Select effective educational resource materials for dissemination.

(8) Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources. Candidates will:

(a) Interpret concepts, purposes, and theories of health education;

(b) Predict the impact of societal value systems on health education programs;

(c) Select a variety of communication methods and techniques in providing health information; and

(d) Foster communication between health care providers and consumers.

(9) Candidates Apply Appropriate Research Principles and Methods in Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Conduct thorough reviews of health-related literature;

(b) Use appropriate qualitative and quantitative research methods; and

(c) Apply research to health education practices.

(10) Candidates Have the Skills to Administer Health Education Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Develop and manage health education program fiscal resources;

(b) Develop and manage human resources; and

(c) Exercise organizational leadership.

(11) Candidates Advance the Profession of Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Provide a critical analysis of current and future needs in health education;

(b) Assume responsibility for advancing the profession;

(c)  Apply ethical principles as they relate to the practice of health education.

(12) Candidates Have the Ability to Differentiate Instruction. Candidates will:

(a) Demonstrate competencies in delivering differentiated instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics;

(b) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students’ strengths and weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

I Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction.

(13) This endorsement is valid to teach:

(a) Health Education;

(b) Advanced Health;

(c)  Food and Fitness;

(d) Drug Education;

(e) Health Promotion;

(f) Health and Wellness Education;

(g) Individual Health Projects;

(h) Chemical and Substance Abuse Education;

(i) Family Living; and

(j) Other health-related courses or activities.

(14) This endorsement is required for teaching any subject in subsection (12) above for more than ten hours per week, or if conditionally assigned in more than one subject (See, OAR 584-036-0081) on:

(a) Any Basic or Standard Teaching License with other than an elementary endorsement in grades 5 through 12; and

(b) Any Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License with a high school authorization.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 -342.143, 342.153, 342.165, 342.223 – 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05; TSPC 2-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-08

584-065-0080

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Basic Math Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for basic math and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add a basic math endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License. The requirements to add a basic math endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at OAR 584-038-0180.

(2) Demonstrated Content Knowledge:

(a) For knowledge of numbers, operations, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of complex numbers and real numbers particularly rational numbers and integers; ways of representing numbers; relationships among numbers and number systems; and the meaning of operations; and

(B) Be computationally proficient and choose the appropriate computational format such as exact or approximate; and method, such as mental, paper and pencil, or electronic.

(b) For knowledge of algebra and functions, candidates will:

(A) Understand the various roles of algebra and demonstrate conceptual understanding of variables and functions including linear, quadratic and exponential functions and their inverses;

(B) Use a variety of representations including verbal, pictorial, tabular, symbolic and graphic to emphasize relationships among quantities; and

(C) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of and skill in appropriate use of symbols.

(c) For knowledge of geometry, candidates will:

(A) Use spatial visualization and geometric modeling and constructions to explore and analyze geometric shapes, structures, and their properties;

(B) Make conjectures about two- and three-dimensional shapes and offer justifications for conjectures; and

(C) Apply coordinates geometry and transformations including the use of congruence, similarity, and symmetry to analyze mathematical situations.

(d) For knowledge of measurement, candidates will:

(A) Understand measurement processes including estimation, accuracy and choice of measurement tool for both U.S. customary and metric systems; and

(B) Understand and use direct and indirect measurement techniques and formulas for both two- and three-dimensional figures.

(e) For knowledge of data analysis and probability and statistic, candidates will:

(A) Design investigations, collect data, use a variety of ways to display the data and critically interpret data representations;

(B) Make predictions and draw conclusions involving uncertainty by applying basic concepts of probability; and

(C) Use appropriate statistical methods to analyze and describe shape, spread, and center data; then they use that information to make inferences.

(f) For knowledge of calculus, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of limits, particularly in relation to understanding series, repetitive processes and non-terminating decimals; and

(B) Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of rate of change and the relationship to minimums, maximums and area of a region.

(3) Demonstrated Competency in Following Process Standards.

(a) For competency in problem solving, candidates will engage in mathematical inquiry through understanding a problem, exploring, conjecturing, experimenting and justifying.

(b) For competency in reasoning and proof, candidates will:

(A) Select and use various types of reasoning including categorizing based on numeric and geometric properties, and using Venn diagrams, set notation and operations; and

(B) Develop and evaluate mathematical arguments such as informal proofs, and the foundations on which arguments are built.

(c) For competency in communication, candidates will:

(A) Organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication;

(B) Communicate coherently and use the language of mathematics, such as symbols and terminology, to express ideas precisely; and

(C) Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.

(d) For competency in representation, candidates will:

(A) Use multiple forms of representation including concrete models, pictures, diagrams, tables and graphs; and

(B) Use invented and conventional terms and symbols to communicate reasoning and solve problems.

(e) For competency in connections, candidates will:

(A) Understand how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole; and

(B) Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.

(4) Demonstrated knowledge and skill in mathematics pedagogy:

(a) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in the principles equity candidates will demonstrate high expectations and strong support for all students to learn mathematics.

(b) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing curriculum, candidates will:

(A) Map curriculum that is coherent, focused on important mathematics and carefully sequenced;

(B) Be familiar with curriculum both preceding and following the middle level; and

(C) Be able to discern the quality of learning opportunities for students when given a particular task, activity, educational software, etc., and are able to make adaptations to assure quality.

(c) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing quality learning environment candidates will foster a classroom environment conducive to mathematical learning through:

(A) Providing and structuring the time necessary to explore sound mathematics and grapple with significant ideas and problems;

(B) Using the physical space and materials in ways that facilitate students' learning of mathematics;

(C) Providing a context that encourages the development of mathematical skill and proficiency; and

(D) Respecting and valuing students' ideas, ways o’ thinking and mathematical dispositions.

(d) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in teaching, candidates will:

(A) Understand what mathematics students know and need to learn and then challenge and support them to learn it well; and

(B) Orchestrate discourse by:

(i) Posing questions and tasks that elicit, engage and challenge each student's thinking;

(i) Listening carefully to students' ideas; asking ‘students to clarify and justify their ideas orally and in writing;

(iii) Deciding what to pursue in depth from among the ideas that students bring up during a discussion;

(iv) Deciding when and how to attach mathematical notation and language to students' ideas;

(v) Deciding when to provide information, when to clarify an issue, when to model, when to lead, and when to let a student struggle with a difficulty; and

(vi) Monitoring students' participation’ in discussions and deciding when and how to encourage each student to participate.

(e) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in learning, candidates will:

(A) Know that students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge; and

(B) Have the ability to recognize and move students from concrete to abstract levels of understanding.

(f) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in assessment, candidates will:

(A) Use a variety of formal and informal, formative and summative assessment techniques to support the learning of important mathematics;

(B) Understand how, why, and when to use various assessment techniques and tools; as well as how these tools inform their understanding about student thinking and understanding; and

(C) Plan instruction based upon the information obtained through classroom and external assessments of each student's developmental’ level.

(g) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in technology, candidates will:

(A) Understand that technology is an integral part of teaching and learning mathematics both influencing what is taught and enhancing how it is learned.

(B) Demonstrate effective and appropriate use of technology.

(h) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in mathematic historical development candidates will demonstrate knowledge of historical and cultural influences in mathematics including contributions of underrepresented groups.

(I) For demonstrated ability to differentiate instruction, candidates will demonstrate competencies in delivering differentiated instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics. Candidates will:

(A) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths and ‘weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(B) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction.

(5) This endorsement is valid to teach any course at or below Algebra I including:

(a) Remedial Math;

(b) Mathematics;

(c) Basic Math;

(d) Math Concepts (grades 6-8);

(e) Pre-Algebra;

(f) Introductory Algebra;

(g) Basic Algebra;

(h) Algebra I;

(i) Competency Mathematics;

(j) Consumer Mathematics;

(k) General Math I & II;

(l) Mathematics Fundamentals;

(m) Math Lab;

(n) Middle Mathematics Skills;

(o) Problem Solving; and

(p) Other math-related courses at or below the Algebra I level.

(6) This endorsement is required for teaching any subject in subsection (4) above:

(a) More than 51% of a full teaching assignment on a Basic or Standard Teaching License with an elementary endorsement issued after 1987 with the licensure code of (016); or

(b) More than 10 hours per week or if conditionally assigned in more than one subject, (See, OAR 584-036-0081) on:

(A) Any Basic or Standard Teaching License with other than an elementary endorsement; or

(B) An Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License with a high school authorization.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.–53, 342.165, 342.223 - 342.232
Hist: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05; TSPC 2-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-08

584-065-0090

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Advanced Math Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for advanced math and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add an advanced math endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License. The requirements to add an advanced math endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at: OAR 584-038-0190 and 584-040-0180.

(2) Demonstrated Content Knowledge.

(a) For knowledge of numbers, operations and algebra, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate knowledge of the properties of the natural, integer, rational, real and complex number systems and the interrelationships of these number systems

(B) Identify and apply the basic ideas, properties and results of number theory and algebraic structures that underlie numbers and algebraic expressions, operations, equations and inequalities;

(C) Use algebraic equations to describe lines, planes and conic sections and to find distances in the plane and space;

(D) Demonstrate the use of algebra to model, analyze, and solve problems from various areas of mathematics, science and the social sciences;

(E) Apply properties and operations of matrices and techniques of analytic geometry to analyze and solve systems of equations; and

(F) Use graphing calculators, computer algebra systems, and spreadsheets to explore algebraic ideas and algebraic representations of information and to solve problems.

(b) For knowledge of geometry, candidates will:

(A) Identify and apply the basic ideas, properties and results of number theory and algebraic structures that underlie numbers and algebraic expressions, operations, equations and inequalities;

(B) Use algebraic equations to describe lines, planes and conic sections and to find distances in the plane and space;

(C) Demonstrate the use of algebra to model, analyze, and solve problems from various areas of mathematics, science and the social sciences;

(D) Apply properties and operations of matrices and techniques of analytic geometry to analyze and solve systems of equations; and

(E) Use graphing calculators, computer algebra systems, and spreadsheets to explore algebraic ideas and algebraic representations of information, and to solve problems.

(c) For knowledge of functions, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate knowledge of the concept of a function and the most important classes of functions, including polynomial, exponential and logarithmic, rational and trigonometric;

(B) Represent functions in multiple forms, such as graphs, tables, mappings, formulas, matrices and equations;

(C) Perform a variety of operations on functions, including addition, multiplication and composition of functions, and recognize related special functions such as identities and inverses and those operations that preserve the various properties;

(D) Use functions to model situations and solve problems in calculus, linear and abstract algebra, geometry, statistics and discrete mathematics;

(E) Explore various kinds of relations, including equivalence relations, and the differences between relations and functions;

(F) Use calculator and computer technology effectively to study functions and solve problems;

(G) Demonstrate specific knowledge of trigonometric functions, including properties of their graphs, special angles, identities and inequalities, and complex and polar forms; and

(H) Use analytic representations, measures, and properties to analyze transformation of two- and three-dimensional objects.

(d) For knowledge of discrete mathematics and computer science, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate knowledge of discrete topics including graphs, trees, networks, enumerative combinatorics and finite difference equations, iteration and recursion, and the use of tools such as functions, diagrams and matrices to explore them;

(B) Build discrete mathematical models for social decision-making;

(C) Apply discrete structures such as: sets, logic, relations and functions, and their applications in design of data structures and programming;

(D) Use recursion and combinatorics in the design and analysis of algorithms; and

(E) Candidates employ linear and computer programming to solve problems.

(e) For knowledge of probability and statistics, candidates will:

(A) Explore data using a variety of standard techniques to organize and display data and detect and use measures of central tendency and dispersion;

(B) Use surveys to estimate population characteristics and design experiments to test conjectured relationships among variables;

(C) Use theory and simulations to study probability distributions and apply them as models of real phenomena;

(D) Demonstrate knowledge of statistical inference by using probability models to draw conclusions from data and measure the uncertainty of those conclusions;

(E) Employ calculators and computers effectively in statistical explorations and practice; and

(F) Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of probability such as conditional probability and independence, and develop skill in calculating probabilities associated with those concepts.

(f) For knowledge of calculus, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with basic calculus concepts such as limits, derivatives and integrals of functions of one and two variables;

(B) Use concepts of calculus to analyze the behavior of functions and solve problems; and

(C) Determine the limits of sequences and series and demonstrate the convergence or divergence of series.

(3) Demonstrated Competency in Following Process Standards.

(a) For competency in problem solving, candidates will engage in mathematical inquiry through understanding a problem, exploring, recognizing patterns, conjecturing, experimenting and justifying.

(b) For competency in reasoning and proof, candidates will select and use various types of reasoning and develop and evaluate mathematical arguments and proof in all the mathematics content knowledge areas.

(c) For competency in communication, candidates will:

(A) Organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication;

(B) Communicate coherently and use the language of mathematics such as symbols and terminology to express ideas precisely; and

(C) Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.

(d) For competency in representation, candidates will:

(A) Use multiple forms of representation including concrete models, pictures, diagrams, tables and graphs; and

(B) Use invented and conventional terms and symbols to communicate reasoning and solve problems.

(e) For competency in connections, candidates will:

(A) Understand how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole; and

(B) Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.

(4) Demonstrated Knowledge and Skill In Mathematics Pedagogy.

(a) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in the principles of equity, candidates will demonstrate high expectations and strong support for all students to learn mathematics,

(b) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing curriculum, candidates will:

(A) Map curriculum that is coherent, focused on important mathematics and carefully sequenced;

(B) Be familiar with curriculum both preceding and following the high school level; and

(C) Be able to discern the quality of learning opportunities for students when given a particular task, activity, educational software, etc., and are able to make adaptations to assure quality.

(c) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing a quality learning environment, candidates will foster a classroom environment conducive to mathematical learning through:

(A) Providing and structuring the time necessary to explore sound mathematics and grapple with significant ideas and problems;

(B) Using the physical space and materials in ways that facilitate students' learning of mathematics;

(C) Providing a context that encourages the development of mathematical skill and proficiency; and

(D) Respecting and valuing students' ideas, ways o’ thinking, and mathematical dispositions.

(d) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in teaching, candidates will:

(A) Understand what mathematics students know and need to learn and then challenge and support them to learn it well; and

(B) Orchestrate discourse by:

(i) Posing questions and tasks that elicit, engage and challenge each student's thinking;

(i) Listening carefully to students' ideas; asking ‘students to clarify and justify their ideas orally and in writing;

(iii) Deciding what to pursue in depth from among the ideas that students bring up during a discussion;

(iv) Deciding when and how to attach mathematical notation and language to students' ideas;

(v) Deciding when to provide information, when to clarify an issue, when to model, when to lead, and when to let a student struggle with a difficulty; and

(vi) Monitoring students' participation ’in discussions and deciding when and how to encourage each student to participate.

(e) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in learning, candidates will:

(A) Know that students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge; and

(B) Have the ability to recognize and move students from concrete to abstract levels of understanding.

(f) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in assessment, candidates will:

(A) Use a variety of formal and informal, formative and summative assessment techniques to support the learning of important mathematics;

(B) Understand how, why and when to use various assessment techniques and tools; as well as how these tools inform their understanding about student thinking and understanding; and

(C) Plan instruction based upon the information obtained through classroom and external assessments of each student's developmental’ level.

(g) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in technology, candidates will:

(A) Understand that technology is an integral part of teaching and learning mathematics both influencing what is taught and enhancing how it is learned.

(B) Demonstrate effective and appropriate use of technology.

(h) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in mathematic historical development candidates will demonstrate knowledge of historical and cultural influences in mathematics including contributions of underrepresented groups.

(i) For demonstrated ability to differentiate instruction, candidates will demonstrate competencies in delivering differentiated instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics. Candidates will:

(A) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths and’weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(B) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction.

(5) This endorsement is valid to teach:

(a) Advanced Algebra;

(b) Trigonometry;

(c) Pre-Calculus;

(d) Calculus;

(e) Statistics & Probability;

(f) Geometry;

(g) Survey Geometry;

(h) Trigonometry Analysis; and

(i) Other math-related courses.

(6) This endorsement is required to teach any math course above the Algebra I level.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.–53, 342.165 & 342.223 - 342.232
Hist:  TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05

Division 66: 2 rules   

584-066-0020

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leader Specialization

(1) An Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leader specialization may be added to any TSPC Basic, Standard, Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License upon completion of the requirements and qualifications found in this rule.

(2) To be eligible for the Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leader (EMIL) specialization, the licensed teacher must have all of the following:

(a) A license authorized to teach in grades K–8 and holding the multiple subjects, basic elementary or standard elementary endorsements;

(b) Three complete years of teaching mathematics in grades K–8 as verified by a Professional Educator Experience Form (PEER) or other verifiable experience if the experience is obtained out of state; and

(c) Demonstrated competency in the following Elementary Math Specialist (EMS) standards as determined by a program approved to offer the Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leaders specialization as evidenced by completion of:

(A) Twenty-four quarter or sixteen semester hours of a TSPC-approved Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leader program; and

(B) An EMIL practicum working with a range of students and teachers.

(3) Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leaders specialist standards include:

(a) Content Knowledge: EMIL professionals must know and understand deeply the mathematics of elementary school as well as how mathematics concepts and skills develop through middle school. This knowledge includes specialized knowledge that teachers need in order to understand and support student learning of elementary mathematics.

(b) Pedagogical Knowledge for Teaching Mathematic: EMIL professionals are expected to have a foundation in pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (Ball, Thames, & Phelps, 2008). This section is informed by and draws upon the 2003 NCATE/NCTM Program Standards: Standards for Elementary Mathematics Specialists.

(c) Leadership Knowledge and Skills: EMIL professionals need to be prepared to take on collegial non-evaluative leadership roles within their schools and districts. They must have a broad view of many aspects and resources needed to support and facilitate effective instruction and professional growth.

(4) Approval of any EMIL program must satisfy the full set of standards including specific objectives which may be found in the publication: Standards for Elementary Math Specialists: A Reference for Teacher Credentialing and Degree Programs; a publication of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120–342.430, 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2014(Temp), f. 4-7-14, cert. ef. 4-8-14 thru 9-22-14TSPC 5-2014, f. & cert. ef. 8-5-14

584-066-0010:   

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Licensed Specialist Standards and Competencies

(1)(a) An Autism Spectrum Disorder Specialization may be indicated on any TSPC Basic, Standard, Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License with a special education endorsement so long as the educator qualifies for the specialization by demonstrated completion of a Commission-approved program for Autism Spectrum Disorder specialization.

(b) Once the specialization is earned and placed on a license, it may only be removed at the educator’s request.

(2) Definitions:

(a) Academic Curriculum: Language arts, mathematics, science, social sciences, health, physical education, world languages, and the arts;

(b) Expanded Functional Core Curriculum: Communication development, social development, self-advocacy, cognitive development, sensory processing skills, organization skills, adaptive skills-life function, and transitional skills for life span.

(3) To be eligible to add an Autism Spectrum Disorder specialization on a TSPC license, the application must:

(a) Hold a Basic, Standard, Initial or Continuing  Professional Teaching License with any special education endorsement;

(b) Provide evidence of three years experience working with a range of ASD learners; and

(c) Completed a Commission-approved program for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Specialization.

(4) Candidates for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Specialization must demonstrate competency in the following standards:

(a) Standard 1: Foundations of ASD: Candidates indicate knowledge of autism spectrum disorders including development and characteristics of learners. Candidates will:

(A) Describe unique developmental and behavioral characteristics of individuals with ASD as identified in DSM and how these: Differ from neuro-typical development; differ across people with ASD; change with age; and impact an individual’s learning;

(B) Describe current theories of etiology for individuals with ASD;

(C) Describe State (OAR) and Federal requirements for assessment, eligibility, and education of individuals with ASD;

(D) Differentiate between medical diagnosis (current DSM definitions) and educational eligibility (federal and state requirements);

(E) Differentiate ASD from other disabilities (differential diagnosis) and identify co-existing conditions associated with ASD and their impact on learning and behavior;

(F) Describe unique learning characteristics of individuals with ASD;

(G) Describe the unique influence of stress, age, instruction, and environmental factors on individuals with ASD;

(H) Describe the standards for determining and a process for locating evidence-based instructional and behavioral interventions for individuals with ASD;

(I) Describe academic curriculum and expanded functional core curriculum for individuals with ASD at various age levels;

(J) Describe current best family-centered practices;

(K) Describe a continuum of placements and services available for the individual with ASD and families;

(L) Describe health issues that potentially impact the individual with ASD and their families;

(M) Describe how to evaluate and access public and private systems and organizations that serve individuals with ASD;

(N) Describe concepts and impacts of self-determination, advocacy, community and family supports in the lives of individuals with ASD;

(O) Provide families with information about community support services such as respite care, in-home behavior support, home health care, transportation, and parent education for individuals with ASD;

(P) Describe typical child development milestones across domains; and

(Q) Identify strengths and needs for an individual with ASD across core and expanded core curricula.

(b) Standard 2: ASD Service Needs: Candidates indicate knowledge of ASD Assessments for Development and Educational Impact on ASD service needs. Candidates will:

(A) Describe the impact that ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity issues have on the assessment of the individual with ASD;

(B) Administer or assist in the completion of the required components of the identification assessment for initial and reevaluation of an individual with ASD;

(C) Select, administer, and assist with appropriate educational assessments to determine the present level of academic and functional performance for individuals with ASD;

(D) Interpret assessment data, write summaries, and report results to teams, including families, in a systematic manner that leads directly to programmatic recommendations for instruction for individuals with ASD;

(E) Collaborate with teams, including families, to identify unique needs and to develop appropriate, functional IFSP/IEP goals, matched to assessment information for individuals with ASD;

(F) Collaborate with teams, including families, to identify sufficient special education and related services to enable the individual with ASD to progress on his or her goals;

(G) Assist teams with development and maintenance of ongoing data collection, data analysis, and progress reports for individuals with ASD;

(H) Assist teams in the assessment of environmental conditions that impact access to learning for individuals with ASD;

(I) Assist teams with a functional behavior assessment (FBA) to design behavior support plans for the challenging behaviors of individuals with ASD;

(J) Describe typical child developmental milestones across domains; and

(K) Identify strengths and needs for an individual with ASD across core and expanded core curricula.

(c) Standard 3: ASD Program Development and Implementation: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of system-wide considerations. Candidates will:

(A) Encourage collaboration with the higher education community, foundations, nonprofit and other organizations engaged in researching critical educational issues;

(B) Facilitate the interpretation, communication and dissemination of research findings related to ASD;

(C) Implement expanded core functional curriculum designed to meet the needs of individual learners with ASD;

(D) Conduct expanded core functional curriculum-based assessment to determine areas to address specific skills to teach, and to identify the appropriate evidence-based interventions to implement for learners with ASD;

(E) Collect data on abilities in all skill areas identified from expanded core functional curriculum-based assessments and other performance-based measures for learners with ASD;

(F) Design, facilitate, monitor, and evaluate instruction that is appropriate for both age and skill level of the learner with ASD;

(G) Apply the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) within a variety of instructional formats with a variety of learners with ASD, in a variety of settings to teach the skills identified from a curriculum-based assessment;

(H) Utilize appropriate evidence-based curricula content appropriate for a full range of learners with ASD.

(I) Design, facilitate, monitor, and evaluate instructional strategies that promote generalization and maintenance of skills across domains and settings;

(J) Facilitate the identification of assistive technology (low-high) across all areas of skill development appropriate to meet the needs of the individual;

(K) Train and coach others to:

(i) Implement the appropriate evidence-based instructional interventions, curriculum content, accommodations, and modifications identified for the learner with ASD;

(ii) Use individual strengths of the learner with ASD to reinforce and maintain skills; and

(L) Plan with the families for the transition needs of the learner with ASD.

(d) Standard 4: ASD Systematic Instruction: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of evidence-based interventions to promote focused, engaged time for learners with ASD. Candidates will:

(A) Match evidence-based interventions with the needs of individual learners with ASD;

(B) Design evidence-based interventions based on components of core and expanded core curricula;

(C) Implement data based decision-making by:

(i) Collecting baseline data;

(ii) Collecting, reviewing, and interpreting ongoing data;

(iii) Modifying program as needed to promote performance; and

(D) Demonstrate with fidelity the implementation of evidence-based strategies across a range of learners with ASD;

(E) Design and implement plans to ensure generalization of skills across settings and materials for learners with ASD;

(F) Demonstrate knowledge of the general education academic curriculum and supports necessary to facilitate the success of the learner with ASD;

(G) Design environmental plans that define expectations for appropriate behaviors across settings, utilizing evidence-based intervention strategies for learners with ASD;

(H) Design visual, auditory, and tactile supports to enable the learner with ASD to:

(i) Predict events and activities;

(ii) Anticipate change;

(iii) Understand expectations in a variety of settings;

(iv) Maintain or re-gain appropriate self regulation for learning; and

(v) Demonstrate independence;

(I) Assist in determining appropriate evidence-based assistive and/or augmentative communication systems;

(J) Plan and implement evidence-based strategies to support sustained peer interactions and memberships across all environments; and

(K) Demonstrate skills in teaching family members to implement expanded core functional curriculum at home.

(e) Standard 5: Training and Coaching of Adults Serving Individuals with ASD. Candidates will:

(A) Work with administrators to organize, set-up, and deliver the Oregon Education Guidelines for ASD Program and Self-Assessment.

(B) Identify appropriate technologies to deliver training and coaching;

(C) Collaborate with teams to analyze and interpret learner data to improve instruction and evaluate the impact of instructional interventions on learners with ASD;

(D) Work with teams to incorporate coaching in school, home, and community environments;

(E) Provide feedback to adults serving individuals with ASD to strengthen teaching practice and improve learning for the learner;

(F) Evaluate the effectiveness of the training and coaching to ensure implementation and improvement in progress for learners with ASD;

(G) Demonstrate how to investigate, access, and evaluate electronic and print resources on ASD;

(H) Assess, plan, and use an appropriate evidenced based format for training and coaching;

(I) Facilitate group processes to help team members work collaboratively to solve problems, manage conflict, and make decisions; and

(J) Model effective skills in listening, presenting ideas, leading discussions, clarifying, mediating and identifying the needs of self and others in order to advance shared goals and professional learning.

(f) Standard 6: Professional Practices for ASD Specialists. Candidates will:

(A) Advocate for professional resources, including financial support, human and other material resources, which allow for the implementation of the Oregon Comprehensive ASD Program;

(B) Represent and advocate for the profession in contexts outside of the classroom, such as:

(i) Be a member of committees or task forces addressing curriculum, assessment, professional development or other educational issues; and

(ii) Participate in local, state or national educational professional associations or professional standards boards;

(C) Access professional organizations and publications related to ASD to keep current on evidence based practices.

(D) Demonstrate professional skills;

(E) Comply with federal, state, and local policies and regulations;

(F) Maintain professional relationships with colleagues, employers, students, and families; and

(G) Participate in on-going professional development activities.

(g) Standard 7: Collaboration with Families and Communities. Candidates will:

(A) Identify access and share resources from community-based services to support individuals with ASD;

(B) Develop comprehensive strategies, including the use of technology, for engaging families and community members as partners in the educational process;

(C) Establish and maintain positive collaborative relationships with families in a manner which acknowledges culture, language, values, and parenting styles of the families;

(D) Apply effective strategies for participating, collaborating, and facilitating team processes; and

(E) Describe the impact of one’s own experience, culture, language, race, and ethnicity on attitudes, beliefs, values, and ways of thinking, behaving, and teaching.

(h) Field Experience: Field experience will be designed in accordance with OAR 584-017-1038 through 584-017-1048 and be aligned with the TSPC Professional Standards Handbook.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 –342.430, 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 4-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-1

Division 90: 2 rules         

584-090-0100

Professional Development Generally

(1) Professional development is required for renewal of most active licenses, registrations and certificates for public school or charter school teachers, administrators, school counselors, school psychologists, school social workers, school nurses.

(2) Continuing professional development (CPD) obligations are common to most professions. CPD is defined as a structured approach to learning to help ensure competence to practice, taking in knowledge, skills and practical experience. CPD can involve any relevant education learning activity, whether formal and structured or informal and self-directed.

(3) Educators seeking to reinstate a renewable license must demonstrate completion of all professional development requirements obtained after the date on which their last active license was issued by the Commission provided continuing professional development (CPD) is required for renewal.

(4) New out-of-state educators may submit professional development obtained prior to licensure in Oregon as a basis for licensure renewal so long as:

(a) The professional development was obtained within the five (5) years immediately preceding the date the first Oregon educator license, registration or certification was issued;

(b) The professional development is consistent with the requirements of this Division; and

(c) The professional development was obtained within the five years immediately preceding the expiration date on the license for which they are seeking renewal.

(5) Professional development is required for renewal of the following licenses, registrations or certificates for teaching, administration, personnel service, and school nursing:

(a) American Indian Language Teaching;

(b) Basic;

(c) Standard;

(d) Career and Technical Education II Teaching (See also, OAR 584-042-0051);

(e) Charter School registrations;

(f) Continuing;

(g) Professional;

(h) Five-Year Career and Technical Education Teaching;

(i) Five Year Teaching (pre-1965);

(j) Initial II;

(k) Limited;

(l) Substitute;

(m) Restricted Substitute;

(m) Distinguished Administrator;

(o) Exceptional Administrator;

(p) Five Year Administrator (pre-1965);

(q) Five Year Personnel Service (pre-1965); and

(r) Professional School Nurse.

(6) Educators who hold dual licensure with other state professional licensing boards are encouraged to fulfill their CPD requirements by completing PDUs provided by those professional licensure areas.

(7) It is the sole responsibility of the licensed educator to ensure accurate completion of continuing professional development upon renewal. Failure to complete continuing professional development does not constitute an “emergency” for the purposes of receiving an Emergency License when CPD requirements have not been met.

(8) If employed during the life of the license, the supervisor or CPD advisor will verify that the educator has successfully completed all CPD requirements to the district superintendent or designee on the TSPC Professional Educational Experience Report (PEER) form prior to renewal of licensure.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120-342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 6-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12; TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13

Division 100:  5 rules

584-100-0036

Highly Qualified Secondary Teacher Not New to the Profession

Teachers not new to the profession teaching core academic subjects in grades nine (9) through twelve (12) in an Oregon high school must meet the following criteria in order to meet the federal definition of "highly qualified teacher." The teacher must:

(1) Hold a Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional, Five Year Teaching License, or an Approved NCLB Alternative Route Teaching License with an endorsement in the core academic area(s) taught; or

(2) Meet the HOUSSE requirements for high school teachers as defined in 584-100-0038; and

(3) Be properly assigned in the core academic subject area in grades nine (9) through twelve (12).

(4) Teachers on an approved conditional assignment permit for any core academic subject may be highly qualified based on completed coursework in the core academic subject area pursuant to OAR 584-100-0038.

Stat. Auth: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.125
Hist.: TSPC 2-2004, f. & cert. ef. 3-17-04; TSPC 4-2004(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 5-14-04 thru 11-9-04; TSPC 6-2004, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-04; TSPC 2-2006(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-3-06 thru 8-2-06; TSPC 8-2006, f. 5-15-06, cert. ef. 7-1-06; TSPC 5-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-15-07

584-100-0026

Highly Qualified Middle Level Teacher Not New to the Profession

Teachers not new to the profession teaching core academic subjects in grades seven (7) and eight (8) in an Oregon middle or junior high school must meet the following criteria in order to meet the federal definition of "highly qualified teacher." The teacher must:

(1) Hold a Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional, Five-Year Elementary, Five-Year Secondary, or an Approved ESEA Alternative Route Teaching License and satisfy one of the following:

(a) Pass the prescribed rigorous state exam in the core academic subject; or

(b) Hold an undergraduate major in the core academic subject area(s); or

(c) Hold a graduate degree in the core academic subject area(s); or

(d) Complete coursework equivalent to an undergraduate major in the core academic subject area; or

(e) Hold advanced certification or credentialing in the core academic subject area; or

(f) Meet the HOUSSE requirements as defined in OAR 584-100-0038; and

(g) Be properly assigned in the core academic subject area in grades seven (7) or eight (8).

(2) Teachers on an approved License for Conditional Assignment (LCA) for any core academic subject may be highly qualified based on completed coursework in the core academic subject area pursuant to OAR 584-100-0038.

Stat. Auth: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.125
Hist.: TSPC 2-2004, f. & cert. ef. 3-17-04; TSPC 4-2004(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 5-14-04 thru 11-9-04; TSPC 6-2004, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-04; TSPC 2-2006(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-3-06 thru 8-2-06; TSPC 8-2006, f. 5-15-06, cert. ef. 7-1-06; TSPC 5-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-15-07; TSPC 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12; TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13

584-100-0016

Highly Qualified Elementary Teacher Not New to the Profession

Teachers not new to the profession teaching multiple subjects in grades kindergarten (K) through six (6) must meet the following criteria in order to meet the federal definition of "highly qualified teacher." The teacher must:

(1) Hold a bachelor’s degree;

(2) Hold a Basic, Standard, Initial, Continuing  Professional, Pre-1965 Five-Year Elementary Teaching License;

(3) Demonstrate subject-matter competency by passing a rigorous Commission-adopted elementary education examination appropriate for grades kindergarten (K) through six (6); or

(4) Demonstrate competency by meeting the following High Objective Uniform State Standards of Evaluation (HOUSSE):

(a) To qualify for HOUSSE, a teaching license must have been awarded prior to July 1, 2007 and a minimum of three years teaching experience in elementary education must have occurred prior to July 1, 2009; and

(b) Complete an approved elementary teacher education program or the coursework equivalent to sixty-quarter hours distributed as follows:

(A) Eighteen quarter or twelve semester hours in language arts;

(B) Twelve quarter or eight semester hours in mathematics;

(C) Nine quarter or six semester hours in science;

(D) Nine quarter or six semester hours in U.S. history, cultural geography, and other social sciences;

(E) Three quarter or two semester hours in health education;

(F) Three quarter or two semester hours in physical education;

(G) Three quarter or two semester hours in music education; and

(H) Three quarter or two semester hours in art education; and

(5) Be properly assigned in grades kindergarten (K) through six (6).

Stat. Auth: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.125
Hist.: TSPC 2-2004, f. & cert. ef. 3-17-04; TSPC 2-2006(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-3-06 thru 8-2-06; TSPC 8-2006, f. 5-15-06, cert. ef. 7-1-06; TSPC 5-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-15-07; TSPC 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12; TSPC 1-2013, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-13; TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13

584-100-0007

Licenses Considered "Full State Licensure"

The following Oregon Teaching Licenses are considered to meet “full state licensure” under the federal ESEA:

(1) Basic Teaching License;

(2) Standard Teaching License;

(3) Initial, Initial I and Initial II Teaching Licenses;

(4) Continuing  Professional Teaching License;

(5) Five-Year Elementary Teaching License;

(6) Five-Year Secondary Teaching License;

(7) Approved ESEA Alternative Route Teaching License;

(8) International Visiting Teacher; or

(9) Charter School Registry.

Stat. Auth: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.125
Hist.: TSPC 2-2004, f. & cert. ef. 3-17-04; TSPC 2-2006(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-3-06 thru 8-2-06; TSPC 8-2006, f. 5-15-06, cert. ef. 7-1-06; TSPC 5-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-15-07; TSPC 1-2013, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-13; Renumbered from 584-100-0101 by TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13

584-100-0006

Definitions

These definitions apply only to division 100.

(1) "Advanced Credential or Advanced Certification" for teachers holding middle level or high school authorization levels:

(a) A Continuing  Professional Teaching License; or

(b) A Standard Teaching License with a Standard endorsement in the core academic subject; or

(c) A certificate from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in the core academic subject area.

(2) "Bachelor's Degree":

(a) A degree obtained from a regionally accredited institution in the United States; or

(b) A degree from a foreign institution that is appropriately accredited as affirmed through the Oregon Office of Degree Authorization; or

(c) A higher degree in the arts or sciences or an advanced degree in the professions from a regionally-accredited institution may validate a non-regionally accredited bachelor's degree.

(3) "Complete School Year": Any related teaching assignment for 135 instructional days in a school year. Exceptions may be appealed to the Executive Director pursuant to OAR 584-052-0027.

(4) "Core Academic Subjects":

(a) English (Language Arts);

(b) Reading or Language Arts (Reading or Language Arts)

(c) Mathematics (Basic or Advanced Mathematics);

(d) Science (Integrated Science, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics);

(e) Foreign Languages (Spanish, French, German);

(f) Civics and Government (Social Studies);

(g) Economics (Social Studies);

(h) Arts (Art or Music);

(i) History (Social Studies);

(j) Geography (Social Studies).

(5) "Elementary Classroom": Any combination of self-contained classrooms in grades preprimary through six in any school identified as an elementary school pursuant to OAR 581-022-0102(25).

(6) "Elementary Teacher": An educator teaching in a self-contained classroom grades preprimary through six.

(7) "Middle-level Classroom": Any classrooms in grades seven or eight.

(8) "New to the Profession": A teacher who has been teaching on an approved license in any U.S. jurisdiction in a public or regionally accredited private school less than three complete school years. (See definition of "Complete School Year" above)

(9) "Newly Hired Teacher": A teacher hired after the first day of the 2002-2003 school year in a Title IA program or Title IA school-wide program. The teacher is not considered "newly hired" if the teacher is already employed in the district and transferred into a Title IA program or Title IA school-wide program.

(10) "Not New to the Profession": A teacher who has been teaching on an approved license in any U.S. jurisdiction in a public or private school for a total of three or more complete school years. (See definition of "Complete School Year" above.)

(11) "Rigorous State Test":

(a) The appropriate commission approved licensure subject-matter test for elementary, middle-level and high school; or

(b) Another state's subject-matter licensure exam designated as a "rigorous state test."

(12) "Secondary School or high school":

(a) A combination of grades ten through twelve in districts providing a junior high school containing grade nine; or

(b) Any combination of grades seven through twelve organized as a separate unit; or

(c) Grades seven through twelve housed with grades preprimary through twelve if grades seven and eight are departmentally organized.

(13) "Self-contained Classroom": An assignment for teaching in grades preprimary through six in which the teacher has full responsibility for the curriculum.

(14) "Subject-matter competency": Subject matter competency may be demonstrated through any one of the following:

(a) Passing the appropriate "rigorous state test;" or

(b) Having a major in the subject-matter area (does not apply to elementary endorsements or authorizations); or

(c) Having coursework equivalent to a major in the subject-matter area (does not apply to elementary endorsements or authorizations); or

(d) Having a graduate degree in the subject matter area (does not apply to elementary endorsements or authorizations); or

(e) Satisfying the Highly Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE) requirements set forth in these rules if the educator has taught three complete years or more.

(15) "Undergraduate Major or Coursework Equivalent to a Major": Thirty-four (34) quarter hours or twenty-three (23) semester hours of undergraduate or graduate coursework in core academic subject matter numbered 100 level or above, from a regionally accredited college or university. (See definition of "Bachelor's Degree" for undergraduate credits obtained from an unaccredited college or university.)

Stat. Auth: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430 & 342.985
Hist.: TSPC 2-2004, f. & cert. ef. 3-17-04; TSPC 2-2006(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-3-06 thru 8-2-06; TSPC 8-2006, f. 5-15-06, cert. ef. 7-1-06; TSPC 13-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-22-06; TSPC 4-2008(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-5-08 thru 11-30-08; TSPC 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 8-20-08; TSPC 2-2009, f. & cert. ef. 3-12-09; TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13