Oregon Teacher Standards and

Practices Commission

 

 

 

 

New Program Proposal

For

 

Continuing Administrator License

 

Southern Oregon University

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact:

Dr. Geoff Mills

School of Education

Southern Oregon University

mills@sou.edu

541.552.6920

 

 

 

February 2008

 

 


Table of Contents

 

                        Section                                                                  Page

 

-Description of the program or endorsement                                   1

OAR: 584-017-0240, 584-017-0261

 

- Continuing Administrator License Coursework                             2

 and Requirements

OAR: 584-017-0240, 584-017-0261

 

-Justification of need for educational personnel in              3

            the proposed specialty

OAR: 584-017-0210

 

- Faculty Preparation and Experience                                              3

OAR: 584-017-0060, 584-017-0070

 

- Financial Resources                                                                        5

OAR: 584-017-0010

 

- Facilities                                                                                           5

OAR: 584-017-0010

 

- Library Resources                                                                          5

OAR: 584-017-0010, 584-017-0050

 

- Proof of Official Institutional Approval                                          6

OAR: 584-017-0010, 584-017-0020

 

- Goals of the proposed program and the relationship                    6

            of those goals to existing program goals

OAR: 584-017-0240, 584-017-0261

 

- CAL Program Structure Alignment with                            7

            TSPC/NCATE Standards

OAR: 584-017-0261, 584-017-0280, 584-017-0282, 584-017-0290

 

- Names of members of the institution's program                            9

development committee

OAR: 584-017-0070

 

- Outline of the organizational structure of faculty              10

            in teacher education showing relationship of

the proposed program to the existing approved program(s)

OAR: 584-017-0010

 

 

 

- Steps to be followed in formulation, development,                        10

evaluation, and renewal of the program

OAR: 584-017-0030

 

- Recommendation from a consortium review of the                       11

proposed program or endorsement

OAR: 584-017-0020

 

- Specific objectives of the program, endorsement              12

 or authorization

OAR: 584-017-0210, 584-017-0220

 

- Student personnel services and procedures, including                  13

selective recruitment, counseling, admission,

and policies for retention

OAR: 584-017-0025, 584-017-0220, 584-017-0230

 

- Counseling, admission, and policies for retention              14

OAR: 584-017-0220, 584-017-0230

 

- Program Evaluation                                                             15

OAR: 584-017-0020, 584-017-0025, 584-017-0030

 

­- Proposed arrangements for practica                                              19

OAR: 584-017-0055, 584-017-0280, 584-017-0282

 

- APPENDIX A:                                                                                 20

Proposed Program for                                               

Continuing Administrator License

OAR: 584-017-0240, 584-017-0261

 

- APPENDIX B:                                                                                 23

Continuing Administrator License               

Course Descriptions

OAR: 584-017-0261, 584-017-0280, 584-017-0282, 584-017-0290

 

- APPENDIX C:                                                                                26

Verification of Program Completion

Verification of Completion of Integration Portfolio

Program Evaluation & Assessment Documents

OAR: 584-017-0025, 584-017-0030, 584-017-0300

 

- APPENDIX D:                                                                                36

Educational Leadership Program

Preliminary Needs Analysis

OAR: 584-017-0210

 

- APPENDIX E:                                                                                 48

Memo and Assessment of Library Resources

OAR: 584-017-0050

 

- APPENDIX F:                                                                                 53

Proof of Official Institutional Support

OAR: 584-017-0010

 

-APPENDIX G:                                                                                  61

Research within the Administrative

            License Program

OAR: 584-017-0210

 

- APPENDIX H:                                                                                 68

Program Development Process                                            

OAR: 584-017-0030, 584-017-0230

 

- APPENDIX I:                                                                                  71

Checklist for Continuing Administrator License                 

Application Packet

OAR 584-017-0220

 

- APPENDIX J:                                                                                 73

CAL Course Syllabi                                                              

OAR: 584-017-0240, 584-017-0261, 584-017-0280, 584-017-0282

 

- APPENDIX K:                                                                                123

Faculty Curriculum Vitae

OAR: 584-017-0060, 584-017-0070

 

-APPENDIX L:                                                                                  158

Documents on file with TSPC

OAR: 584-017-0020, 584-017-0035, 584-017-0045, 584-017-0050

 


584-010-0055

Review of Programs for Institutions Not Previously Approved

(1) When an institution not previously approved seeks approval, it shall submit to the commission a new program. Such plans shall describe means by which the institution seeks to adapt to changing priorities in education programs.

(2) The proposal shall include:

(a) Title of the program or endorsement

            Continuing Administrator Licensure Program (CAL)

(b) Description of the program or endorsement

OAR

Title

584-017-0240

Scope and Sequence of courses, course descriptions

584-017-0261

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Required for Continuing Administrator License

 

The objective of the program is to prepare highly qualified educational leaders for the region. This objective will be met through coursework and practica. Students completing the program will be eligible for the Oregon Continuing Administrator License.

 

SOU’s Continuing Administrator License (CAL) Program offers a unique curriculum composed of relevant courses identified by practicing school administrators in the Southern Oregon region (See Appendix A: Continuing Administrator Licensure Program). The unique focus of the proposed CAL program is the incorporation of pertinent courses addressing themes identified by practitioners that reach beyond traditional educational methods and approaches to leadership and organizations.  This expanded view of organizational leadership enables a more flexible and meaningful opportunity to mix the theory and practice of educational administration across a larger breadth of academic fields, rather than a linear, course-by-course approach from only an educational perspective.  The coursework for the CAL provides theoretical foundations and opportunities for students to engage with the content and standards required for the Continuing Administrative License by TSPC and NCATE.  Practica experiences require students to move from the theoretical foundation into actual practice at a variety of authorization levels.

 

The CAL program’s outcomes-based focus is accomplished through attention to appropriate concepts of adult learning as a process for instruction to prepare educational leaders for the challenges of working with adults.  Problem-centered learning opportunities will provide CAL candidates an opportunity to apply theory to real problems facing today's administrators at the school, district, state, and national levels.  The outcomes-based focus will encourage students to serve as instructional leaders to develop and share instruction with faculty and administrators.  These experiences will allow the CAL students to demonstrate significant involvement in constructing teaching and learning opportunities in real-life situations in the schools.  Opportunities for ongoing peer evaluation and feedback regarding performance and professional development will be provided.  Students will explore and share their own literacy processes. Because the International Reading Association recommends the exploration of teacher and administrators' literacy processes as a crucial component of school leadership, the CAL students will explore and share their own experiences in relation to achievement of the TSPC Administrator Standards. To this end, in addition to required readings, students in the program will share critical leadership literature with their colleagues on a term-by-term basis.  The culminating event of the program, the Capstone Portfolio, will enable the CAL students to reflect on their growth as leaders throughout the program coursework and practicum experiences.  Artifacts collected in the portfolio will illustrate the students' progress toward meeting the NCATE standards as adopted in the OAR 584-017-0261.

 

The unique aspect of this program is the focus on “outcomes-based practice.”  Rather than the traditional reliance on “seat time,” the CAL program, similar to the IAL, utilizes a combination of workshops, modules, practicum, and online learning, discussion and sharing.  This multidimensional format provides a more flexible and meaningful opportunity to mix the theory and practice of educational administration.  The focus on outcomes is more appropriate to meet the TSPC Standards, rather than a linear, course-by-course approach.  Each quarter of the program, the course work and practica evolve from identified focus areas within the Standards for administrators.  Students work interactively with SOU faculty and the students’ mentors in the field to determine how outcomes for each of the standards will be met through the combination of traditional coursework, practicum experiences, and workshops taught in conjunction with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District’s professional development activities.  All program activities are to be developed through collaborative efforts among SOU faculty and southern Oregon practicing administrators.  Students will document on a term-by-term basis the outcomes they have mastered for each focus area for the term.  They conclude the CAL program with a capstone portfolio that documents the outcomes achieved within the Standards.  An alternative approach to the delivery of the program is inherent in the outcomes-based focus through innovative coursework.

 

¨      Continuing Administrator License Coursework and Requirements ( See Appendix B

 

Leadership Seminars: (9-12 credits)

·        LEAD 564: Supervision & Evaluation of Instruction (3-4 credits)

·        LEAD 585: Contract Management and Human Resources (3-4 credits)

·        LEAD 588:  Cultural and Organizational Leadership (3-4 credits)

 

Practicum in Applied Leadership (9 credits)

  • LEAD 528:  Leadership Into Practice (9 credits)

 

Capstone Portfolio (1 credit)

  • LEAD 520:  Portfolio (1 credit)

                                                     

Courses for Supporting Area 

(9-12 credits required across all three areas)                              

  • Leadership and Organizations

            LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Leadership & Organizations (1-4)

            ED548  Culture, Family, Community Involvement (3)

            SPED 555 Advanced Legal Issues (3)

            MM513 Strategic Management (3)

 

  • Organizational Culture and Diversity

            LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Culture and Diversity (1-4)

            Ed 547 Impact of Culture in the Classroom (3)

            Ed 594 Native American Educational Issues (3)

            SPED 557 Current Issues in SPED (3)

            Comm 555 Negotiation and Conflict (4)

 

  • Evaluation and Assessment

            LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Evaluation & Assessment (1-4)          

            Ed 579 School Improvement Measures (3)

 

(c) Justification of need for educational personnel in the proposed specialty;

584-017-0210

Purpose for Administrator License

In an informal survey conducted of Superintendents from school districts in Southern Oregon (Josephine, Jackson, and Klamath Counties) by Oregon Education Service District Superintendent Steve Boyarsky, the findings indicated that 40% of school administrators are likely to retire in the next three to five years.

 

Dr. Ernie Stringer was contracted to meet with southern Oregon administrators to discuss the development of the administrator program at SOU. His reports of May, 2004 and April 2005 regarding program need and design and regarding the role of research in the program are included (See Appendix D: Educational Leadership Program—Preliminary Needs Analysis).

 

(d) Evidence of institutional capability for carrying out the program, including faculty preparation and experience, financial resources, facilities, library resources, and proof of official institutional approval;

¨Faculty Preparation and Experience

584-017-0060

Program Faculty

584-017-0070

School-Based Personnel for the Program

 

Four SOU faculty are assigned to the program (see Appendix K for full curriculum vitae):

            Ken Kempner, Ph.D., serves as program director of Educational Leadership with his FTE assigned to directing, teaching, and advising students in the program.  Kempner has had considerable experience in Educational Administration programs, having served as a faculty member at Portland State University in the administrative license program and as faculty member and program coordinator of Educational Policy and Management at the University of Oregon. Kempner is widely published in the field of educational leadership and has continued his research and writing on culture and equity issues in leadership.

Geoff Mills, Ph.D., Dean of Education, will contribute teaching and advising time to the program. Mills’ professional interests and teaching background include action research, anthropology and education, educational change and qualitative research methods. He has done extensive writing in research having co-edited two books and authored "Action Research: A guide for the teacher researcher.”

Gregg Gassman, Ph.D., Coordinator of the Special Education program, will assist in teaching and mentoring students in the CAL program.  Because the CAL program is organized around modules and specialty areas within the field of education, Gassman will participate specifically on topics of Special Education administration, law, and program evaluation.  As with other Education faculty, time Gassman devotes to the CAL program that  he would have spent in the Special Education program will be covered by Adjunct Professors paid for by revenues from the CAL program.  Gassman’s areas of professional interest and expertise in addition to Special Education include curriculum and instruction, at-risk issues, classroom and behavior management. He is a former school administrator and special education program director.

Roni Adams, Ph.D., MAT Program, will teach and mentor in the CAL program. Adams is a Native American and has served as an administrator and founder of a charter school in California and as an adjunct professor prior to coming to SOU. Her teaching and research interests include culture and diversity issues, effective instructional practices, school culture, and curriculum development in cultural diversity.

 

The following individuals have all taught in the IAL program and are members of the Educational Leadership Advisory Committee.  Again, because the CAL program is structured around seminars and specialty areas these busy individuals are able to participate in seminars and workshops on a periodic but continuing basis as needed to support the program.  All these individuals also participate as mentors for the CAL candidates’ practicum and portfolio development.

-Ben Bergreen, Superintendent, Phoenix-Talent School District

-Steve Boyarsky, Superintendent, Southern Oregon ESD

-Juli DiChiro, Superintendent, Ashland School District

-Randy Gravon, Superintendent, Central Point School District

-Susan Inman, Principal, Jefferson Elementary School, Medford

-Phil Long, Superintendent, Medford School District

-Cynde Rickert, Superintendent, Eagle Point School District

-Pam Zaklan, Principal, Wilson Elementary School, Medford

Other School leaders also participating in the CAL program include the following individuals who have previously taught in the IAL program and will conduct seminars and workshops on a periodic basis for the CAL program.

            -Allan Barber, Principal, Eagle Point High School

            -Dan Barton, Educational Consultant and former Administrator, Seattle Schools

            -Kevin Campbell, South Medford High School

            -Nancy Golden, Superintendent, Springfield Schools

            -Ivan Hernandez, Superintendent, Fern Ridge Schools

            -Beth Hauser, Small Schools Initiative, South Medford HS

            -Barry Victov, Educational Consultant and former Administrator,

Santa Cruz Schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

¨      Financial Resources

584-017-0010

University support for resources, Library, Technical

 

            As noted above, four faculty members are assigned to the IAL program, no additional faculty will be required to staff the program.  In particular Dr. Kempner’s time, as Coordinator of Educational Leadership, has become possible through his return to the School of Education following completion of his tenure as Dean of Social Sciences, Education, and Health and PE.  Assignments of other faculty are allocated through shared teaching assignments with other programs.  Secretarial and administrative staff support for the CAL program is achieved through integration of Admissions and Advising with other existing programs and reassignment of duties.  Other expenses for program development, advertising, library resources will be available through revenues generated by the program.

 

¨      Facilities

584-017-0010

University support for resources, Library, Technical

 

The School of Education has sufficient facilities and administrative capacity to offer courses and provide support for the program.  The CAL program will stand in conjunction with the existing IAL, MAT, MEd, and endorsement programs already approved and operating within the School of Education. 

 

¨      Library Resources (See Appendix E)

584-017-0010

University support for Library Resources

584-017-0050

Resources

 

In a Memo and Assessment of Library Resources for the CAL program, November 9, 2007, Dale Vidmar, Library Instruction Coordinator/Education, Communication, and Health and Physical Education Librarian, provided the following response:

The analysis of the Hannon Library’s resources to support the Continuing Administrative Licensure Program indicates strong support in the journal and documents area. However, the Education Department should work collaboratively with the Library’s Education liaison to concentrate some existing book funds toward purchasing material that would fill gaps in our current collection. Given the major reductions that the department allocations have experienced over the past few years, it may be necessary to provide a one-time funding of $650 to achieve an allocation close to the 2002-2003 fiscal expenditure. (See Appendix E:)

 

 

 

 

¨      Proof of Official Institutional Approval (See Appendix F)

584-017-0010

Designation of the Unit

584-017-0020

Consortium

 

  • SOU Senate approval, January 14, 2008 (minutes not available)
  • Minutes of SOU Graduate Council approval
  • Minutes of Consortium Meeting approval
  • Minutes of School of Education Faculty Meeting approval
  • Minutes of Teacher Education Committee Meeting approval
  • Minutes of SOU Educational Leadership Advisory Committee Meeting approval

 

(e) Goals of the proposed program and the relationship of those goals to existing program goals;

584-017-0240

Scope and Sequence of Courses

584-017-0261

Knowledge and Skills Required for CAL

On the basis of research conducted by Stringer, Greenwood, Zinn, and Kempner regarding the need and goals of an Educational Administration program in Southern Oregon (see Appendix G: Research Within the Initial Administrative Licensure Program),  the goals of SOU’s proposed CAL program are to provide administrators with:

·        The capacity to deal effectively with complex situations that are now part of school contexts in Oregon.

·        Skills and knowledge to manage ongoing administrative responsibilities.

·        Personal development that enables them to develop a clear vision of their leadership roles.

·        The ability to actively engage their central mission as educational leaders.

·        A supportive network of colleagues.

These goals will be accomplished by a curriculum that prepares educational administrators to:

·        Articulate a culturally competent vision based on a concerted educational philosophy of serving the needs of all students and the local, national and global communities.

·        Have an in-depth understanding of cultural diversity, instructional and learning processes, and the skills to lead and evaluate creative educational systems within the context of the district and external communities.

·        Lead others effectively by demonstrating an understanding of the organizational and cultural context of schools that create a safe and supportive environment for students, teachers, and the community

·        Understand the legal, historical, social, political, and cultural influences on education and the consequences of these influences on the daily leadership of schools.

·        Develop skills to recruit, motivate, and retain culturally competent school personnel while working collaboratively with parents and the entire cultural breadth of the community to facilitate a positive learning environment at the school and district levels.

·        Manage fiscal resources effectively for the betterment of all students, teachers, and the community on the basis of an ongoing consideration of best practices and relevant data for school improvement in the socio-political context of the district and state.

·        Maintain and model the highest ethical principles and cultural awareness for students, teachers, parents, and the community.

Within the framework of SOU’s CAL program the curriculum has been developed toward achievement of these goals.  Through the integration of conceptual and applied issues across the program, rather than in discrete and isolated courses, the SOU program will offer students a more holistic experience that recognizes the interrelationship of policy, cultural, economic, and organizational issues in today’s schools and districts.  As described above in this proposal and presented below in the alignment of coursework with NCATE Standards and OAR 548-17-0261, each of the themes or class sessions addresses the SOU program goals in relation to the TSPC rules and NCATE standards.

¨      CAL Program Structure Alignment with TSPC/NCATE Standards

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(1) Visionary Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.

(a)  Develop a vision

 

 

 

X

X

X

X

 

 

(b)  Articulate a vision

 

 

 

X

X

X

X

 

 

(c)  Implement a vision

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

(d)  Steward a vision

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

(e)  Promote community

      involvement in the vision

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(2) Instructional Improvement: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.

(a)  Promote positive school

      culture

 

X

X

X

 

 

X

 

(b)  Provide effective instructional

      program

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

(c) Apply best practice to student    

      learning

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

X

(d)  Design comprehensive

       professional growth plans

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(3) Effective Management:  Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

(a)  Manage the organization

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

(b)  Manage operations

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

(c)  Manage resources

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(4) Inclusive Practice: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources in order to demonstrate and promote ethical standards of democracy, equity, diversity, and excellence, and to promote communication among diverse groups.

(a) Collaborate with families and

      other community members

 

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

(b) Respond to community

      interests and needs

 

 

X

X

 

X

X

X

(c) Mobilize community

      resources

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(5) Ethical Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.

(a) Acts with integrity

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

X

 

(b) Acts fairly

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

X

X

(c)  Acts ethically

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(6) Socio-Political Context Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

(a)  Understand the larger context

 

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

(b)  Respond to the larger context

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

(c)  Influence the larger context

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

X

 

 

NCATE Standards

(align with OAR 548-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

LEAD 507:

Contract Man.

& Law

LEAD 564:

Supervision

& Eval of

Inst.

LEAD 508:

Workshop on

Leadership & Organ.

LEAD 528:

Leadership into Practice

 

LEAD 520:

Portfolio

Interdisciplinary:

Leadership & Organizations

Interdisciplinary:

Organ. Culture & Diversity

Interdisciplinary:

Eval & Assessment

(7) Practicum Experience: The practicum provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in Standards 1-6 through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real settings, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit.

(a)  Substantial

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

(b)  Sustained

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

(c)  Standards-based

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

(d)  Real Settings

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

(e)  Planned and guided cooperatively

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

(f)  Graduate Credit

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

(f) Names of members of the institution's program development committee;

584-017-0070

School-based Personnel for the Program

 

The CAL program will draw extensively on local school leaders and practitioners to supervise CAL candidates, participate in seminar sessions, and conduct workshops and classes.  The following individuals have all taught previously in the IAL program, are members of the Educational Leadership Advisory Committee and have been actively involved in the development of the proposed CAL program.  Again, because the CAL program is structured around seminars and specialty areas these individuals are able to participate in seminars and workshops on a periodic but continuing basis as needed to support the program.  All these individuals also will participate as mentors for the CAL candidates’ practicum and portfolio development.

-Ben Bergreen, Superintendent, Phoenix-Talent School District

-Steve Boyarsky, Superintendent, Southern Oregon ESD

-Juli DiChiro, Superintendent, Ashland School District

-Randy Gravon, Superintendent, Central Point School District

-Susan Inman, Principal, Jefferson Elementary School, Medford

-Phil Long, Superintendent, Medford School District

-Cynde Rickert, Superintendent, Eagle Point School District

-Pam Zaklan, Principal, Wilson Elementary School, Medford

 

Other School leaders also participating in the CAL program and its development include the following individuals who have previously taught in the IAL program and will conduct seminars and workshops on a periodic basis for the CAL program.

            -Allan Barber, Principal, Eagle Point High School

            -Dan Barton, Educational Consultant and former Administrator,

Seattle Schools

            -Kevin Campbell, South Medford High School

-Nancy Golden, Superintendent, Springfield Schools

            -Ivan Hernandez, Superintendent, Fern Ridge Schools

            -Beth Hauser, Small Schools Initiative, South Medford HS

            -Barry Victov, Educational Consultant and former Administrator,

Santa Cruz Schools

 

(g) Outline of the organizational structure of faculty in teacher education showing relationship of the proposed program to the existing approved program(s);

584-017-0010

Designation of the Unit

Southern Oregon University currently offers licensure programs in general education (MAT), special education (SPED), administrator license (IAL), and endorsement programs in English as a Second or Other Language (ESOL) and Reading (READOregon). Faculty in the MAT and SPED programs were involved in developing the CAL program. Faculty in all programs frequently collaborate to provide instruction and promote a cohesive understanding of the variety of educational needs students in schools experience.

Because of these existing programs, the School of Education has developed strong partnerships with local school districts. Students in each of the programs engage in practicum experiences in many schools throughout the Southern Oregon region.

The Continuing Administrator Licensure program would allow the University to increase opportunities for students locally. Existing programs provide students with opportunities to enter education careers. The CAL program provides enhanced opportunities for school leaders to attain the next level of certification, following the IAL. No university now serves the comprehensive educational and professional development needs of the Southern Oregon region's educational administrators.  Development and implementation of the IAL and CAL programs by Southern Oregon University fills this void in service to the region.  Portland State University has offered the IAL and CAL programs in the region with part-time, adjunct faculty but, as of announcement of the PSU Dean of Education in November 2007, PSU will terminate its administrator license program in Southern Oregon in 2008.  PSU did not, however, employ full-time, tenured faculty in Southern Oregon to provide program supervision, advising, and assessment.   The current IAL and proposed CAL programs offered by SOU will be coordinated by a full-time, tenured professor (Dr. Ken Kempner) who will coordinate other SOU faculty and regional district administrators in delivering, monitoring, and advising students in the program on a continual basis.  Unlike part-time faculty at a distance, the SOU faculty will be available as mentors during both the student’s administrative program and subsequently in their continuing development as practicing administrators.

 

(h) Steps to be followed in formulation, development, evaluation, and renewal of the program;

584-017-0030

Evaluation and Improvement of the Program

Development of SOU’s administrator program was conducted at three basic levels.  Initially, planning was conducted within the School of Education among faculty members associated with the IAL program, Special Education, Master’s of Education (MEd), ESL, and Native American program and the Dean of the School.  The next level of planning included members of the Advisory Committee, which includes local Principals, Superintendents, and the Superintendent of the Southern Oregon Educational Service District.  The final level of planning included other external groups including the Teacher Education Constoritum, SOU’s Graduate Council, and Faculty Senate.

Internal planning within the School of Education included frequent meetings among faculty as part of MEd planning sessions to review SPED, ESL, Native American, and Reading programs. The Dean and IAL Coordinator also met individually to discuss and plan the creation and implementation of the CAL.  These planning sessions between the Dean and IAL coordinator also expanded to include the Superintendent and Director of Instructional Improvement of the ESD to develop a joint process to combine the efforts of SOU and the ESD in leadership training.  As draft plans for the program were developed, the Dean and IAL Coordinator met informally and during scheduled meetings with members of the Advisory Committee.  The Southern Oregon school district administrators participating in all these sessions served on the Educational Leadership Advisory Committee since the development and planning of the IAL program in 2004.  Planning sessions for the IAL program included meetings on October 12, 2004; November 17, 2004; January 13, 2005; and March 16, 2005.  During the creation and implementation of the IAL program plans also commenced for planning the CAL program.  The underlying philosophies for both the IAL and CAL were developed jointly with the detailed planning of the CAL beginning during the 2005 IAL meetings.  Since authorization of the IAL the Advisory Committee has met at least twice each year with joint and individual CAL planning meetings on a more frequent basis.  Individual meetings among SOU faculty and Advisory members, email discussions, and exchanges of program draft plans have been conducted since initiation of the IAL.  Joint planning meetings of the Advisory Committee took place on the following dates: Aapril 17, 2006, November 14, 2006, May 21, 2007, and November 28, 2007.  The commitment of the Advisory Committee to both the development and implementation of the IAL and CAL programs has been energetic and informative.

 (i) Projected schedule in the program developmental process;

Planning for the program began during the 2005-2006 school year based on the research conducted by Dr. Ernie Stringer, meetings of the Advisory Committee, and experience gained in the implementation of the IAL program.  The approval process for at SOU was conducted as noted in Section 2(d) above.  Initiation of the program will commence by fall 2008.

(j) Recommendation from a consortium review of the proposed program or endorsement;

584-017-0020

Consortium

 

  • Attached minutes of April  27, 2006 Teacher Education Committee Meeting (See Appendix F: Proof of Official Institutional Support)

(k) Evidence of review of the proposed program by the Oregon Degree Authorization.

Alan L. Contreras, Administrator, Office of Degree Authorization, Oregon Student Assistance Commission, in correspondence on August 1, 2005 explained authorization was not required for the proposed IAL program:  “The mere fact that TSPC issues a revised or amended teaching license based on a revised set of courses that you offer does not mean that you have a ‘new program’ under the meaning of our law.” Similarly, review and degree authorization for the CAL are not required.

 

(l) Specific objectives of the program, endorsement or authorization;

584-017-0210

Purpose for Administrator License

584-017-0220

Selection, Recruitment and Admission of Candidates

 

      As noted above in Section 2(b) the objective of the program is to prepare highly qualified educational leaders for the Southern Oregon region. The proposed CAL program will offer a comprehensive, high quality program based on the TSPC standards for the Continuing Administrator License.  The proposed program will take advantage of regional, highly qualified and experienced university faculty and southern Oregon school district administrators serving as adjunct faculty.  One of the value added aspects of the proposed program is that SOU faculty will participate in an ongoing basis in the administrative program and the continuing development of the students, especially during the program's internship phase. The CAL program will build on the substantial K-12 partnerships that exist between SOU and the 13 school districts in the three county region.  To serve the needs of educators in the region SOU offers the Master of Arts in Teaching for pre-service teachers, the Master’s of Education for licensed teachers along with endorsement programs in ESL/Bilingual Education, Reading, and Special Education.  The IAL meets the needs of regional school leaders by providing the first level of authorization for administrators.  The proposed CAL will now allow practicing administrators to gain the knowledge and experience to proceed to the next level of authorization when their IAL licenses expire.

The IAL and CAL programs directly support the mission of Southern Oregon University to serve the region by providing “access to opportunities for personal, intellectual, and professional growth through quality education and scholarship.” Development of the program emerges from a partnership between university faculty and local school administrators that commenced during the spring of 2004. These same partners continue to be integrally involved in the implementation of the IAL and CAL programs to provide an approach to educational leadership that is both visionary and pragmatic.  

The proposed CAL program is aligned both with the University’s and Oregon University System’s (OUS) values and vision that support long-term career agility and informed civic leadership. The SOU administrator license program was created in response to the Oregon University Board’s charge to enhance the state’s capacity to respond effectively to social, economic and environmental challenges and opportunities.  The SOU administrator program prepares school administrators in the region and Oregon who support the creation, synthesis, and application of knowledge and a new vision for teaching and learning. The educational administration program at SOU, beginning with the IAL, was developed in collaboration with local stakeholders through their work on the Advisory Committee.  The IAL was created in direct response to the Academic Excellence/Economic Development (AE/ED) Working Group of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education.  The AE/ED Working Group included K-12 administrator preparation as one of the “potential opportunity areas” for development by OUS.  The Working Group charged OUS with providing principals and superintendents with the best education to guide and develop 21st Century schools.  Members of the AE/ED Working Group visited the SOU campus on April 7, 2004, and received a briefing on the proposed administrator leadership program as part of SOU's commitment to the OUS initiatives. Following the presentation, the AE/ED Working Group encouraged SOU to move ahead with the development of the administrator license program, commencing with the IAL.

 

 

(m) Student personnel services and procedures, including selective recruitment, counseling, admission, and policies for retention;

584-017-0025

Evaluating and Verifying Candidate Competency

584-017-0220

Selection, Recruitment and Admission of Candidates

584-017-0230

Retention and Advising

 

·        Services and Procedures

The proposed CAL program at SOU will be integral to the other components of the School of Education’s current license programs, MAT and MEd degrees, and endorsement options.  In particular, the CAL will provide the next step in the development of knowledge, skills, and experience for school leaders holding the IAL. 

Current personnel services and procedures for SOU’s degrees and TSPC approved license programs are already in place and have been in operation for a considerable number of years.  As noted, Dr. Ken Kempner, Coordinator of the Educational Leadership program, will manage and direct the CAL and the IAL.  He will be assisted in administration of the program by Margaret Wright, Administrative Assistant and Teacher License Specialist, who will take responsibility for maintaining admission and certification records.  She will assume this responsibility along with her current duties in maintaining the Teacher License records and admissions system.  As with her Teacher License duties, she will be available during normal business hours for all student questions and requests.

 

·        Selective Recruitment

Because Southern Oregon University already has license and degree programs in Education a network of collaboration exists with all school districts in the Southern Oregon region. SOU professors are daily in regional schools supervising teachers and other degree and license applicants and have long-standing professional associations with school and district administrators.  As explained above, planning for the administrator license program began with interviews of regional administrators and then creation of the Advisory Committee to help develop the IAL program and then recruit promising administrators from the Advisory Committee members’ districts.  Advisory Committee members have already been collaborating with the IAL program to identify teachers and program directors within their districts who they wish to advance into administration.  Administrators currently holding the IAL license, either from SOU’s program or another institution, will be recruited to attain the next level of certification through SOU’s proposed CAL program.  Recruitment efforts will include, but not limited to the following activities:

                  -Advisory Committee member nominations for candidates to the program

                  -In-school recruitment by SOU supervising professors

                  -Distribution of CAL brochures and literature in the schools and district

                              offices.

                  -Targeted recruiting through ESOL and ELL programs for Hispanic and

                              underrepresented groups.

                  -Radio advertisements through SOU’s Extended Campus Program and

                              summer school.

                  -Alternative route recruitment through SOU’s Masters in Management

                              program and Non-profit Business endorsement.

                  -Recruitment of Native American educators through SOU’s new program,                                      Kum Tux Hiyu, to train Native American teachers.  This program is

                              a grant sponsored by the Office of Indian Education to recruit and                                                   train Native American teachers.  The Educational Leadership program is

already working with Kum Tux Hiyu to recruit administrators from the

                                    Native American teaching force for the IAL.

 

·        Counseling, admission, and policies for retention

584-017-0220

Selection, Recruitment and Admission of Candidates

584-017-0230

Retention and Advising

 

The SOU participating professors in the CAL program (Kempner, Mills, Gassman, Adams) will share the advising and counseling load for the CAL cohort.  Each faculty member has considerable experience advising students both in license and degree programs.  Each faculty member will also assist in supervising advisee’s practicum in the field as appropriate.

 

Students will be admitted throughout the year on a quarterly basis.  The decision for an open-entry, year-round program, rather than the cohort-based program of the IAL, is based on the nature of the Continuing License where practicing administrators holding the IAL have vastly different renewal deadlines, needs, and flexibility on when to attain the CAL. Admission into the program is based on the standard applications for SOU graduate students, which requires:

-        A relevant standardized test score (CBEST, Graduate Record Exam, Miller Analogies, etc.), letters of recommendation, graduate level standing (GPA= 3.0).

-        Master’s degree and Initial Administrator License

-        Three years of successful teaching experience;

-        Evidence of high moral standards through completion of a “character” questionnaire, evidence of previous work experience, and competence to work with school-aged children;

-        Evidence of completion of a teacher or personnel service preparation program and the granting of a teaching or personnel service licensure in Oregon;

-        Competitive admissions will be based on letters of recommendation from supervising administrators or program directors, interviews, and, as appropriate, follow up phone calls to references.  SOU intends to keep a high level of admissions to the program through maintaining a modest-sized cohort.

 

To be retained in a graduate academic program, students must maintain a GPA of 3.0.  Once a student is selected to the program and demonstrates high motivation and reasonable academic progress the faculty will strive to assist students through any difficulties in their management of time and academic standards.  The criteria for admittance will have indicated SOU’s intent to have the student in the program where the faculty will work toward helping the student achieve success.  Should students have difficulty maintaining these standards the advisor will first work with the student and then consult the Educational Leadership Coordinator on any plans necessary for remediation.  Student’s work will be evaluated each term, as part of the class coursework grading and portfolio development.  Portfolio work will be reviewed each term.  Working with students is greatly facilitated by support from the Advisory Committee members, many who serve as mentors or supervisor mentors in the schools.  Since the majority of CAL students are practicing administrators or school leaders, students will be motivated by their peers to keep pace during the program and will have the benefit of assistance from colleagues and the close association with SOU faculty and participating administrators.  Dismissal from the program, only in the most unusual of circumstances, will follow the procedures prescribed for Graduate students in the SOU student handbook. (See Appendix I: Checklist for CAL Application Packet).

 

·        Program Evaluation

584-017-0020

Consortium

584-017-0025

Evaluating and Verifying Candidate Competency

584-017-0030

Evaluation and Improvement of the Program

 

Ongoing evaluations by students following each class regarding their learning will inform program development in terms of both content and instructional delivery systems. Advisory Committee members, practicum practitioners/mentors, and faculty will provide feedback regarding student performance through both quantitative and qualitative evaluations.  Outside evaluation will also be ongoing because of the symbiotic organization of the program involving SOU faculty working with local administrators. Finally, the Annual Report provided to TSPC by the Dean of the School of Education required by OAR 584-010-0050 will provide evaluation data regarding the program and its graduates.

 

Formative evaluation for ongoing program improvement at each session for both content and instructional delivery methods will be used to assess how goals for each session were met and will inform planning for subsequent sessions.  The Integration Portfolio, developed by candidates throughout the program, will demonstrate the candidates’ ongoing development as administrators. In addition, student self assessment, faculty review, and practicum mentor evaluations of candidates’ performance will be incorporated throughout the program. Faculty, mentors and candidates will also engage in frequent and regular dialogue and feedback regarding candidates’ progress in the program and their professional development.

 

A variety of quantitative and qualitative methods will be employed to assess graduate outcomes. These include:

-        participant written reflections following each term’s presentations;

-        quarterly course evaluations by students;

-        exit interviews;

-        observation of practicum experience;

-        review of practicum by university field supervisor and practicum mentor;

-        employment data regarding program completers;

-        one-year follow-up interviews;

-        supervisor interviews;

-        tracking of program completers and percentage of cohort completing program

 

Long Term goals:  As noted in this proposal, the overall objective of SOU’s proposed program is to prepare highly qualified educational leaders for the region and for the larger state of Oregon. This objective will be met through the attainment of both long term and short term goals for the individual students and entire CAL program.  To gain a clearer understanding, first, of the long term goals for the CAL program, planning for the SOU program began, as previously discussed, with a research study conducted by Dr. Ernie Stringer.  Stringer’s interviews with regional administrators, many who are members of SOU’s Advisory Committee, noted the significance of developing a program that “integrates research as a major component, both as a set of skills that could enhance the work of a principal, and as an approach to learning within the program.”  Stringer’s findings explained further that:

 

On the basis of Stringer’s findings and the overall objective of SOU’s administrator license program, the long term goals for evaluating the effectiveness of the CAL are as follows:

 

·        Prepare highly qualified leaders for the Southern Oregon region and state of Oregon.  This goal will be assessed through evaluation of students’ coursework, practicum experience, identification of needs through interviews and direct work with SOU advisors and school administration mentors, placement and completion rates of CAL students.

·        Prepare highly qualified school leaders who are able to develop solutions to complex problems that are an ongoing part of the daily life of schools.  This goal will be evaluated through post-graduation follow-up, feedback from Advisory Committee members, and observations on site visits by faculty.

·        Provide opportunities for leaders to accomplish significant leadership tasks, such as the development of school improvement plans.  Evaluation will be accomplished through post-graduation follow up of CAL participants and their role as mentor for future IAL and CAL students and mentoring opportunities.

·        Prepare highly qualified leaders who are able to evaluate the strength or significance of research related to significant areas of school life.  Evaluation of this long-term goal will be accomplished through coursework and practicum experience evaluations.

 

Short-term goals:  The above long-term goals will be achieved through meeting short-term program goals related directly to the individual coursework and practicum experiences provided the students through the CAL program activities.  In his research Stringer found a strong theme running through interviews was the need for principals to have the capacity to engage in practically-oriented research, defined by some as action research. Stringer noted that the implication of his findings was that principals need to engage in systematic processes of inquiry with staff in order to:

 

·  Establish baseline data in the context of NCLB

·  Use data as a “lubricant” for school improvement

·  Apply analyses to a broad framework of desired educational outcomes

·  Identify processes for improving performance in designated areas

·  Identify populations or groups needing special attention

·  Monitor developments and performance levels

·  Evaluate existing research for application and appropriate implementation at the

   individual school and district level.

 

Because there is considerable pressure on schools to accomplish increased performance, as measured by student test scores, student retention rates, and increased attendance, Stringer found in his research the need for principals not only to engage in processes of inquiry to identify ways of accomplishing these requirements, but being able to deal with related data.  Methods of evaluating student outcomes that more closely reflected the multiple outcomes required of educating children was as high priority. In the current context of NCLB there is an increasing need for principals to know processes for gathering, analyzing and interpreting data, and relating these processes to the accomplishment of desired outcomes. While student test data measures children’s success, interpretation of data is needed to meet AYP or NCLB standards.

 

As presented above in 2(e) (CAL Program Structure Alignment with NCATE Standards and OAR 548-17-0261), each of the standards areas is integrated into the curriculum through individual courses, practicum, and other mentoring experiences. Because SOU’s School of Education already delivers graduate degree, licensure and endorsement programs existing instruments for student course evaluations and practicum experiences and mentor evaluations will be used for the CAL program, adapted as appropriate for leadership experiences. These short-term goals will be evaluated through a variety of formative and summative evaluation procedures.

 

Formative and Summative Assessments:  Given the need to accomplish both the short term and long term goals of the CAL program, ongoing evaluations by students following each class regarding their learning will inform program development in terms of both content and instructional delivery systems. Advisory Committee members, practicum practitioners/mentors, and faculty will provide formative feedback regarding student performance through both quantitative and qualitative evaluations.  Outside evaluation will also be ongoing because of the symbiotic organization of the program involving University faculty working with local administrators. Finally, the Annual Report provided to TSPC by the Dean of the School of Education required by OAR 584-010-0050 will provide an element of the summative evaluation data regarding the program and its graduates.

 

Formative evaluation for ongoing program improvement at each session for both content and instructional delivery methods will be used to assess how goals for each session were met and will inform planning for subsequent sessions.  The Integration Portfolio, developed by candidates throughout the program, will also provide formative evaluation during the program and a summative evaluation of the experience at the end of the program. The portfolio will demonstrate the candidates’ ongoing development as administrators. In addition, student self- assessment, faculty review, and practicum mentor evaluations of candidates’ performance will be incorporated throughout the program. Faculty, mentors and candidates will also engage in frequent and regular dialogue and feedback regarding candidates’ formative progress in the program and their professional development.

 

A variety of quantitative and qualitative methods will be employed to assess graduate outcomes. These include:

·  Formative assessments

            -participant written reflections following each module presentation

            -observation of practicum experience

            -course evaluations

            -student self-assessment of group presentations

            -open-ended assessment of program experience to date

            -focus group discussion at end of each course session on effectiveness,                                            suggestions for improvement, plans for next session

            -feedback from Advisory Committee members and Consortium

            -student portfolio entries, papers, evidence

            -review of practicum by university field supervisor and practicum mentor

            -peer evaluations provided by cohort members

·  Summative assessments

            -exit interviews

            -employment data regarding program completers

            -one-year follow-up interviews

            -supervisor interviews

            -assessment of summative evaluation by Advisory Committee and Consortium

            -tracking of program completers and percentage of cohort completing program

            -TSPC Report by School dean

 

Procedures/Criteria to evaluate program:  The following procedures will be used to implement the formative and summative evaluation presented above:

 

·        Formative Procedures:

            -At the end of each term session student course evaluations will be reviewed by

             faculty to determine strengths and weaknesses of each course element.

                  -Faculty will meet at the end of teach term to evaluate outcomes of student focus

                  group discussions, quality of presentations and invited presenters.

                  -Faculty will meet each term to discuss advisees practicum experiences

                   and plans for the following term.

                  -Faculty will meet with the Advisory Committee in the fall and spring terms and

                  as needed throughout the year.  Advisory Committee members will be provided

                  with formative evaluation data to provide feedback on program assessment and

                  suggestions for program development.

                  -Faculty will meet with field supervisors to discuss and evaluate practicum

                  experiences.

 

·        Summative Procedures:

-Faculty will present to Advisory Committee outcomes of long-term follow up with program graduates to assess strengths and weaknesses of curriculum and practicum experiences.

-Faculty will report outcomes of long-term data analysis to Advisory Committee and School dean to assess participant and program success.

-Exit interviews, program follow up and other student data will be reviewed each spring by faculty to determine appropriateness of student experiences for purposes of program development.

-Through outcomes presented in the TSPC yearly report, faculty will work with TSPC and the School dean on program development goals.

 

Evaluate results for consortium:  A summary of the qualitative and quantitative data will be presented to the School of Education’s Southern Oregon Education Consortium for their review and comments.  As the Consortium has been operating in conjunction with other TSPC approved programs, the CAL will naturally become an integral part of the School of Education’s and the Consortium’s consideration of SOU’s service to the educational community of southern Oregon.  As noted, the Consortium has reviewed and approved the CAL program.

 

 

(n) Proposed arrangements for practica.

584-017-0055

Practica and Student Teaching

584-017-0280

Field Experience for Administrator License Program

584-017-0282

Internship Experience for Administrator License Program

At the initiation of students’ programs they will identify particular research interests to guide their planning for practica. In addition, the students will be assigned specific tasks and experiences for their practica each quarter. The assignments will parallel demands administrators face during the course of the school year specifically as these demands address concerns at the district level as informed by the TSPC/NCATE Standards.  Students in the program will, in collaboration with SOU faculty, identify mentors to support their work. Mentors will be selected based on their experience and current level of responsibility related to district level activity.

All CAL students in the final stages of their program will enroll in LEAD 520, Portfolio (one credit), to focus their specific efforts upon completion of the Integrated Portfolio.  Although students will begin the development of the Portfolio when they begin the program, experience from the IAL program has shown dedicated time is needed for students to successfully synthesize and gain professional knowledge from the Integrated Portfolio experience.  Because CAL students’ programs are not in a condensed, one-year experience of the IAL students, enrollment in LEAD 520 will assist them in completion of the Portfolio.  The Portfolio also provides evidence of completion of the student’s practicum experiences.  This evidence in the Portfolio will include maintenance of a practicum log showing the time and activities engaged in. In addition, students will collect artifacts during practica to illustrate their progress toward meeting the standards found in OAR 584-017-0261 Standards for Continuing Administrator Licensure. Students are required to complete a minimum of 270 practicum hours engaged in activities approved by their SOU supervisor in association with school mentors.

 

 

 

APPENDIX A:

 

 

Proposed Program for

Continuing Administrator License

 

584-017-0240

Curriculum Design

584-017-0261

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Required for Continuing Administrator License


SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY

PROPOSED PROGRAM FOR CONTINUING ADMINISTRATOR LICENSE

           

 

NAME ___________________________________             Student ID number______________________________                                                     

PHONE___________________________________            Email________________________________________                        

 

ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________________________________                                                                                                       

 

CAL Leadership Seminars  (9-12 credit hours)

 

 

 

Major

Standards

Addressed

 

Credit

 

 

Grade

 

Date

 

Instructor

LEAD 564: Supervision & Evaluation of

                    Instruction

2,3,5

3-4

 

 

 

 

LEAD 585: Contract Management and   

                    Human Resources

3,5,6

3-4

 

 

 

LEAD 588: Cultural and Organizational 

                   Leadership*

1,3,4

3-4

 

 

 

           TOTAL FOR CAL Seminars ___9-12____ 

 

Practicum in Applied Leadership (6 credits)

 

LEAD 528:  Leadership Into Practice

 

1-7

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

                                         TOTAL____ 9______  

Capstone Portfolio (1 credit)

 

LEAD 520:  Portfolio

 

7

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                 TOTAL___ _1______  

Supporting Areas (9-12 credits total: refer to approved elective courses on next page)

 

Leadership and Organizations*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,3,5,6

 

1-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organizational Culture and Diversity* 

 

1,4,6

 

1-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation and Assessment*

 

2,3,6

1-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                           TOTAL Minimum Credits     9                                             

 

                                                CAL Program TOTAL Minimum Credits:       27   

 

*These courses may be taken in association with pre-approved workshops and seminars conducted by the Southern Oregon ESD, Confederation of Oregon School Administrators, Oregon School Boards Association or other prep-approved courses.         

 

PROGRAM APPROVALS:  

CAL Advisor                                                                                                Date: ______________                              

Dean of Education                                                                                        Date: _____________


 

 

Approved Courses for Supporting Area  

(12 credits required across all three areas)

                           

  • Leadership and Organizations

            LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Leadership

            ED548  Culture, Family, Community Involvement

            SPED 555 Advanced Legal Issues

            MM513 Strategic Management

 

  • Organizational Culture and Diversity

            LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Culture and Diversity

            Ed 547 Impact of Culture in the Classroom

            Ed 594 Native American Educational Issues

            SPED 557 Current Issues in SPED

            Comm 555 Negotiation and Conflict

 

  • Evaluation and Assessment

            LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Evaluation & Assessment

            Ed 579 School Improvement Measures

           


 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX B:

 

Continuing Administrator License

Course Descriptions

 

584-017-0261

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Required for Initial Administrator License

584-017-0280

Field Experience for Administrator License Program

584-017-0282

Internship Experience for Administrator License Program

584-017-0290

Knowledge of School Law for Administrators

 

 

 


CAL Course Descriptions

·        LEAD 564: Supervision & Evaluation of Instruction (3-4 credits)

This course examines the role of the building and district administrators as instructional leaders.  The approach of the course is both from theoretical and applied perspectives on effective instructional and curriculum leadership. Instructional leadership includes applying knowledge and skills about effective instruction and curriculum to improve teaching practices to increase student learning.

·        LEAD 585: Contract Management and Human Resources (3-4 credits)

The responsibilities central office personnel and school building administrators have with understanding, monitoring, and maintaining labor agreements that govern employment practices at the school and district levels provide the focus for this course.  The responsibilities associated with maintaining agreements through the collective bargaining process, legal implications related to grievances, aggregations, violations, and irregularities in the management of the collective bargaining agreement and human resource management will be considered.  These implications will include dispute resolution and other grievance procedures by faculty, students, parents, and community members.

·        LEAD 588: Cultural and Organizational Leadership (3 credits)

This seminar considers advanced concepts on the application of cultural competence in relation to Organizational Theory, Behavior, and Administration.  Theoretical concepts addressed will be drawn from across the broad field of management behavior in Business, Industry, Government, and Education with a focus on cultural diversity and awareness and legal implications.  Theories will include those dealing with how organizations are managed at both behavioral and administrative levels in diverse settings.   Differences across the various levels of organizations will be considered, especially as these differences affect legal, cultural, and political aspects of schools and educational organizations.  This seminar will be directed toward an inquiry of effective and culturally competent organizational leadership at the district level and the various administrative components of budget, finance, evaluation, law, and assessment.  This seminar may be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course.

·        LEAD520 Administrative Portfolio (1-3 credits)

LEAD 520 is an independent study course that supports the development of a professional portfolio for candidates who are completing their administrative license at either the Initial or Continuing levels. The purpose of the professional portfolio is to show evidence of meeting Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) requirements for the administrative licensure, Standard 7: Practicum Experience.  Successful completion of the Practicum, as documented by the Portfolio must meet the following criteria:  evidence of a substantial and sustained practicum that is standards-based, accomplished in real settings across all authorization levels, planned and guided cooperatively, and taken for graduate credit.  Candidates will work with their practicum mentor, SOU supervising professor, and the LEAD Program Coordinator to plan, develop, and submit the Portfolio.

·        LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Leadership and Organizations (1-4 credits)

This Reading and Conference focuses on issues of organizational leadership in the schools and community.  Students will work with their Mentor, CAL Coordinator, and Instructor of record to develop an independent study to strengthen the CAL candidate’s theoretical understanding of organizational issues, legal aspects, and leadership at the building and district levels.  Readings and assignments for this Independent Study will be determined collaboratively depending upon the agreement among the student, Practicum Mentor, Instructor of record, and CAL Coordinator. This seminar may also be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU Reading and Conference.

·        LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Culture and Diversity (1-4 credits)

Issues of culture and diversity in the schools and the larger community provide the focus for this reading and conference.  Students will work with their Mentor, CAL Coordinator, and Instructor of record to develop an independent study to strengthen the CAL candidate’s theoretical understanding of cultural and legal issues and leadership.  Readings and assignments for this Independent Study will be determined collaboratively depending upon the agreement among the student, mentor, instructor, and CAL Coordinator. This seminar may also be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course.

·        LEAD505 CAL Reading and Conference on Evaluation & Assessment (1-4 credits)

This Reading and Conference focuses on issues of evaluation and assessment in the schools and community.  Students will work with their Mentor, CAL Coordinator, and Instructor of record to develop an independent study to strengthen the CAL candidate’s theoretical understanding of evaluation and assessment issues and legal requirements at the building and district levels.  Readings and assignments for this Independent Study will be determined collaboratively depending upon the agreement among the student, Practicum Mentor, Instructor of record, and CAL Coordinator. This seminar may also be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course


 

 

 

APPENDIX C:

 

Verification of Program Completion

Verification of Completion of Integration Portfolio

Program Evaluation & Assessment Documents

 

584-017-0025

Evaluating and Verifying Candidate Competency

584-017-0030

Evaluation and Improvement of the Program

584-017-0300

Verification of Program Completion

 

 

 

 

 

 


Southern Oregon University

CAL PROGRAM

Administrator Proficiencies Summary

 

Candidate Name:  ____________________________________________

 

SOU Advisor Name: ____________________________________________

 

 

Levels of Field Experience

  

       The attached "Practicum Log" documents that field experiences were completed at the following levels:

                        Elementary School

                        Middle School

                        High School

 

 

Proficiencies Documented in Portfolio

 

          The attached "Integration Portfolio Assessment" details the candidate's documentation of each proficiency with reference to those required for the Administrator License (outlined in  OAR 584-17-0261).   In summary, all required proficiencies have been:

 

                                     Met                                      Not Met

 

 

 

SOU Advisor Signature: ____________________________________

 

                                Date: ____________________________________

 


 

 

Southern Oregon University

CAL Program

Integration Portfolio Assessment

 

Student _____________________________ SOU Faculty  _________________________

 

Mentor _____________________________  Schools ______________________________

 

 

 

NCATE Standards   (align with OAR 584-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

(1): Visionary Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.

 

Rating

Comments

(a)  Develop a vision

 

 

(b)  Articulate a vision

 

 

(c)  Implement a vision

 

 

(d)  Steward a vision

 

 

(e)  Promote community involvement in the vision

 

 

(2) Instructional Improvement: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.

(a)  Promote positive school culture

 

 

(b)  Provide effective instructional program

 

 

(c) Apply best practice to student learning

 

 

(d)  Design comprehensive professional growth plans

 

 

 

See attached for additional comments

 


Southern Oregon University

Integration Portfolio Assessment

 

(3) Effective Management:  Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

 

Rating

Comments

(a)  Manage the organization

 

 

(b)  Manage operations

 

 

(c)  Manage resources

 

 

(4) Inclusive Practice: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources in order to demonstrate and promote ethical standards of democracy, equity, diversity, and excellence, and to promote communication among diverse groups.

(a) Collaborate with families and other community members

 

 

(b) Respond to community interests and needs

 

 

(c) Mobilize community resources

 

 

(5) Ethical Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.

(a) Acts with integrity

 

 

(b) Acts fairly

 

 

(c)  Acts ethically

 

 

(6) Socio-Political Context Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

(a)  Understand the larger context

 

 

(b)  Respond to the larger context

 

 

(c)  Influence the larger context

 

 

(7) Practicum Experience: The practicum provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in Standards 1-6 through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real settings, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit.

(a)  Substantial

 

 

(b)  Sustained

 

 

(c)  Standards-based

 

 

(d)  Real settings

 

 

(e) Planned and guided cooperatively

 

 

See attached for additional comments


Southern Oregon University

CAL Program

Quarterly Proficiency Assessment

 

Student _________________________School ______________________________________

 

Mentor _________________________Practicum focus ______________________________

 

University Faculty ________________Date ________________________________________

 

 

NCATE Standards   (align with OAR 584-17-0261, effective 1/1/2006)

(1): Visionary Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.

 

Rating

Comments

(a)  Develop a vision

 

 

(b)  Articulate a vision

 

 

(c)  Implement a vision

 

 

(d)  Steward a vision

 

 

(e)  Promote community involvement in the vision

 

 

(2) Instructional Improvement: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.

(a)  Promote positive school culture

 

 

(b)  Provide effective instructional program

 

 

(c) Apply best practice to student learning

 

 

(d)  Design comprehensive professional growth plans

 

 

See attached for additional comments

 

 


 

Southern Oregon University

CAL Program

Quarterly Proficiency Assessment

 

(3) Effective Management:  Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

 

Rating

Comments

(a)  Manage the organization

 

 

(b)  Manage operations

 

 

(c)  Manage resources

 

 

(4) Inclusive Practice: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources in order to demonstrate and promote ethical standards of democracy, equity, diversity, and excellence, and to promote communication among diverse groups.

(a) Collaborate with families and other community members

 

 

(b) Respond to community interests and needs

 

 

(c) Mobilize community resources

 

 

(5) Ethical Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.

(a) Acts with integrity

 

 

(b) Acts fairly

 

 

(c)  Acts ethically

 

 

(6) Socio-Political Context Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

(a)  Understand the larger context

 

 

(b)  Respond to the larger context

 

 

(c)  Influence the larger context

 

 

 

See attached for additional comments


Self-Assessment of Progress on Meeting TSPC Standards

 

NAME:______________________________                        Date:___________________

 

1) Visionary Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.

(a)  Develop a vision           (b)  Articulate a vision

(c)  Implement a vision        (d)  Steward a vision  (e)  Promote community involvement in the vision

Explain your level of accomplishment in the area of visionary leadership.  Give examples of how you have achieved this level of competence:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2) Instructional Improvement: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.

(a)  Promote positive school culture                 (b)  Provide effective instructional program

(c) Apply best practice to student learning     (d)  Design comprehensive professional growth plans

Explain your level of accomplishment in the area of Instructional Improvement.  Give examples of how you have achieved this level of competence:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3) Effective Management:  Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

(a)  Manage the organization  (b)  Manage operations  (c)  Manage resources

Explain your level of accomplishment in the area of Effective Management.  Give examples of how you have achieved this level of competence:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4) Inclusive Practice: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources in order to demonstrate and promote ethical standards of democracy, equity, diversity, and excellence, and to promote communication among diverse groups.

(a) Collaborate with families and other community members (b) Respond to community interests and needs

(c) Mobilize community resources

Explain your level of accomplishment in the area of Inclusive Practice.  Give examples of how you have achieved this level of competence:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(5) Ethical Leadership: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.

(a) Acts with integrity         (b) Acts fairly       (c)  Acts ethically

Explain your level of accomplishment in the area of Ethical Leadership.  Give examples of how you have achieved this level of competence:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6) Socio-Political Context Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge, ability, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

(a)  Understand the larger context  (b)  Respond to the larger context  (c)  Influence the larger context

Explain your level of accomplishment in the Socio-political context with particular emphasis on your cultural competence.  Give examples of how you have achieved this level of competence:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Southern Oregon University

CAL Completion

Follow-up Evaluation

 

 

 

1) What aspects of the CAL program and experience did you find the most rewarding?

 

 

2)  Has the CAL program had an immediate impact on your current practice as a teacher or educational leader?

 

 

3)  What aspects of the CAL program do you think could be improved?

 

 

4)  Overall, how do you judge the experience of the CAL program both for your personal and professional growth?

 

 

5)  In our continual revision and evaluation of how to improve both the IAL and CAL programs what suggestions do you have for areas of future emphasis at the school level (for the IAL) and district level (for the CAL).  We are particularly interested in your perspectives on how we can help future and current administrators to better adapt to the changing cultural, political, and social changes in schools?

 

 


 

 

 

APPENDIX D:

 

Educational Leadership Program

Preliminary Needs Analysis

 

584-017-0210

Purpose for Administrator License

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

 

PRELIMINARY NEEDS ANALYSIS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Ernie Stringer

May 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CONTENTS

 

Executive Summary…………………………………………3

Introduction………….……………………………………....5

The Context………………………………………………….5

Leadership  Program Curriculum…………………………....6

Leadership…………………………………………….…7

Communication……………………………………….…7

Law………………………………………………….…...8

Teaching and Learning…………………………………..8

Research………………………………………………....9

Management Skills………………………………………9

Staff Management.……………………………………...10

Technology……………………………………………..10

Conclusion…………………………………………...…10

Program Instruction and Learning…..……………………...10

School University Partnerships……………………………..11

Conclusion………………………………………………….12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

2.     Needs/Goals

Educational leaders require a rigorous program that provides them with:

·        The capacity to deal effectively with complex situations that are now part of school contexts in Oregon.

·        Skills and knowledge to manage ongoing administrative responsibilities.

·        Personal development that enables them to develop a clear vision of their leadership roles.

·        The ability to actively engage their central mission as educational leaders.

·        A supportive network of colleagues.

It should be a flexible program that fits program activities to the demanding realities of school leadership. 

 

2.  Curriculum

The curriculum should include:

  • Leadership:  The art of leadership
  • Communication:  The capacity to communicate effectively with staff, students, parents and the public
  • Law:  The way legal issues applied to administrative work
  • Teaching and learning:  Knowledge of best practices in teaching and learning that would enable administrators to fulfill their educational leadership roles
  • Research:  The ability for administrators to read and understand current research on teaching and learning and to engage in their own research
  • Educational foundations:  Encompassing leadership within a broader understanding of education
  • Management:  Organizing and managing work in order to accomplish school educational purposes
  • Staff management:  How to effectively manage staff
  • Technology: Increasing efficiency through the use of computer technology and effectively use of technology for teaching/learning purposes

3.     Instruction and Learning

The curriculum should incorporate a program of learning that would have direct applicability to administrator’s professional development. It should be enjoyable, invigorating and inspiring, providing the means to re-energize them and enhance their professional lives. Instructors in the program should ensure that participants experience the positive leadership processes they were expected to demonstrate in their professional life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching/Learning processes within the program should focus on:

 

  • Problem-solving approaches that develop the capacity to apply content knowledge to the solution of problems and issues administrators experience in their day-to-day work in schools.
  • Sufficient theory to enable an understanding of the broader context of those issues.
  • Instruction that is largely supplied by experienced, successful administrators who ground program work in their own school experiences.
  • Instructors from people with high levels of expertise in specific content areas.
  • Cohorts that provide program participants with a peer support network.

 

School-University Partnerships

            Development of an Educational Leadership program would provide a context for developing strong School-University partnerships. These would embrace possibilities for:

 

  • School improvement
  • Research
  • Professional development
    EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

PRELIMINARY NEEDS ANALYSIS

 

Introduction

            In the period from 29 April to 5 May I interviewed 6 principals and 3 superintendents in Ashland, Phoenix and Talent. Visiting principals in the schools was an enlightening experience, providing rich insights into their professional lives. The busy hum of school life and ever-present people hovering in the background, waiting for the principal’s attention, spoke volumes of the continuing demands made on them. As they “unhooked” themselves from the ongoing schedule of activities, gave instructions to divert phone calls, and closed the door of their office, they did so with an almost perceptible air of “thank God it’s quiet,” turning their attention to me, refocusing their attention and asking “And what can I do for you.” They not only gave generously of their time, but did so thoughtfully, frankly and professionally. Interviews provided a significant glimpse into the lives of these principals, providing insight into the multiple demands and pressures, but also the potential rewards they saw as the outcome of their leadership activities. All of them focused for significant periods on what they saw as their “core business” or “central mission”—the provision of a good education for the children. As one superintendent said, “You need to sustain yourself in these roles by redirecting thinking to your central mission—the education of kids in schools.”

This, then, sets the tone for the development of a leadership program. If their vision is to be accomplished then the major focus of the program will need to be on the development of educational leaders who will work with their staff to provide the best education possible for the children of the region. Although they all recognized the need for a rigorous program that would provide them with the administrative skills enabling a smoothly operating school, the major focus of their comments and the clear emotional engagement was on their responsibilities as educational leaders.

The Context

            It is apparent that the work of principals and superintendents is highly demanding. Scheduling appointments with them must be done some time ahead as their timetables are often filled days in advance, and many commented on the continuing demands on their times. “We don’t get time to think about the broader educational issues in which we’re involved. We are constantly dealing with some crisis or another.” “We’re so busy we’re being hammered.” Many commented on the need for future principals to develop the ability to deal with effectively and efficiently with the ongoing crises that frequently emerged, without warning, from their daily routine work. “You need to be ready to deal with anything. Things sometimes just erupt and you must be able to be clear and cool.” “It’s so easy to get sucked into a crisis mentality.”

            This is especially true in the current context where an ongoing state budgetary crisis, with slashed budgets creating havoc among superintendents and principals. Further, the ongoing mandates of increasingly heavy-handed federal laws provide pressures and anxieties in teaching staff and principals alike. One principal spoke of the “perfect storm” emerging from three colliding fronts—the state budgetary crisis, No Child Left Behind, and high-stakes testing. As one said, “’No Child Left Behind’ has redirected our work dramatically.” This provided the broad context within which principals dealt with day-to-day issues and crises that included:

 

  • Unrest in the teaching staff brought on by the current context
  • Media beat-ups on government services, including schools, often with limited information
  • Drugs
  • Behavior-disordered students

 

            All administrators, however, saw the need to acquire the capacity to work within the framework of current requirements. As one said, “There needs to be a lot of emphasis on how to turn it into something positive. We need to help teachers learn how to deal with change. We also need to learn how to have the courage to lead. All changes are not good and principals are often caught in-between the superintendents, the state, and the teachers.” She went on to talk of the need to support teachers, who are intimidated by the current thrust of No Child Left Behind and to look at ways to take what is positive and work from there. She typified, in many ways, the comments that most principals and superintendents made of the current context. As one superintendent indicated:

 

“You need to sustain yourself in these roles by redirecting thinking to the central mission of the role …. what we are doing in the schools to ensure that kids reach high levels of success. There’s a big disconnect between that and what we do as administrators. We know what kids need to be successful. How do we promote these things, even when they go against the grain of, for example, standardized testing?”

 

            The perspectives of superintendents and principals that are the basis for this report therefore provide a depth of understanding of the needs of educational leaders in the region. A key feature of their discussions was the emphasis they placed on leadership rather than administrative competence. Though the leadership program must necessarily provide basic administrative competencies, the voices of current administrators suggest that it will be particularly powerful if those competencies can be encompassed within a program that provides a rigorous, creative and professional approach to leadership. This becomes clearly evident in the following sections that describe ways in which the administrative content of a leadership program should be envisaged, not as a dull set of prescriptions, but as a set of boundaries that set the context for strong and creative professional leadership.

Leadership Program Curriculum

            A leadership program curriculum must necessarily incorporate the standards inherent in Oregon state standards for administrators and superintendents, but it would be fruitful for program developers and instructors to consider the contextual relevance of those standards. As administrators spoke of those standards it became evident that they would need to be encompassed within a program of learning that was directly relevant to the ongoing practical realities of school and classroom life. One principal suggested that the program focus on issues they dealt with on a daily basis, including readings that they could bring back to their own work. “Building the curriculum would be easy—email administrators and ask them what the issues are.”

The need to focus on pragmatic issues became evident as principals and superintendents explored their experience in their own licensure programs and compared it to their school experiences. The following section provides a preliminary focus for the type of issues that respondents indicated should be incorporated into an effective leadership program:

 

Leadership

            Respondents spoke of the need for a focus on the art of leadership:

 

  • Leadership style            The need to become consciously aware of their own values, their own leadership style and the way they dealt with crises.
  • Reflection         Reflection as a strong component of the program and modeled by the instructors.
  • Balance            The ability to find a balance so that the job doesn’t become all-consuming—to find ways of setting goals that are flexible
  • Professional development          “The mechanics of keeping the system going is not enough. We need to explore and develop our leadership role.”
  • Diversity           Administrators needed to be aware that people from different backgrounds didn’t necessarily think or act like them. They needed to be able to acknowledge that diversity and work with it constructively.

 

Communication

“Communication is critical, [but we have to] get away from the jargon titles. We need something that is straightforward.” Respondents focused strongly on how an administrator’s ability to communicate was relevant to a wide range of his/her responsibilities. These included not only the capacity to communicate effectively with staff, students, parents and the public, but a range of other proficiencies:

 

  • Trust                Building trust with teachers and parents
  • Diversity           Developing relationships with bilingual and multicultural populations
  • Media              How to talk to the press and deal with bad press
  • Television         How to interview on TV
  • Selection          Knowing what to include and what not to say
  • Public relations How to get good publicity for your school—being an advocate for education, for your school. Dealing with the public and public perceptions. Public relations are critical.
  • Information       Using brochures, websites and other means of communication
  • Writing Skills    The ability to write effectively to diverse audiences
  • Oral communication      The ability to communicate effectively with parents, teachers, and the public

 

 

Law

“You’re not going to make us into lawyers in a few weeks. We need to have a basic knowledge of the law, but know how that is applied to practical issues we have to deal with—custody, school enrolment, how to read legal documents, and so on.”

            Respondents had many suggestions about the way legal issues applied to their administrative work. They felt that analysis of legal cases related to school would help gain the necessary competence for their administrative roles. An incomplete list of legal issues includes:

 

  • Rules and regulations                Knowledge of administrative rules and regulations: Oregon Administrative Rules; Oregon Law Relating to Public Schools; No Child Left Behind; Civil Rights Law; Special Education regulations; and so on.
  • Hiring and firing            Procedures for creative construction of duties and positions. Hiring and firing of staff
  • Union negotiations        Negotiating contracts

 

Teaching and Learning

 

“I would have liked to have spent more time on teaching and learning—to get to know what good teaching looks like.”

 

The focus on teaching and learning was a common and strong theme throughout conversations with principals and superintendents. They wanted to be updated to current best practices so that they could fulfill their role as educational leaders. They wished to extend their expertise in the following areas:

 

  • Curriculum development           How to develop an effective program of  learning
  • Assessment                  Effective and diverse ways of assessing student work—“It’s not just a test score.”
  • Evaluation                     Ways to evaluate the effectiveness of a program of learning
  • Strategies of teaching                Analysis of the literature on specific areas of teaching and learning—reading, strategies of teaching, etc.
  • Disadvantaged kids       Making school a positive experience for disadvantaged kids
  • Social issues                 Including the social work aspects of working with kids
  • The literature                Major contributors to teaching and learning

 

Research

            The ability to read and understand current research on teaching and learning was a common issue. Some also wished to upgrade their own research skills. One noted that she would like to learn how to run a good survey. A number of administrators suggested the need for a strong focus on action research that provided the means to actively engage processes of inquiry for school improvement and professional development purposes. Research related issues included:

 

Best practices               The need to be updated on the best practices in teaching and learning

Evaluation         The need to critically read and analyze research reports—to be able to evaluate the quality of research and to know how to evaluate the different perspectives being presented.

Balance            One respondent remarked that it was important to get a balanced and well-rounded view that did not merely focus on the instructor’s own research or professional orientations.

 

Educational Foundations

            Most principals and superintendents spoke of the need to encompass their leadership within a broader understanding of education. They spoke of the need to extend people’s horizons, to provide a more sophisticated vision of education that went past mandates and administrative procedures. At a time when school systems are changing rapidly they saw the need to explore issues such as:

 

  • Citizenship        “We need to look more at the big picture—healthy learning that produces good citizens”
  • Ethics               The ethical and moral basis of school leadership
  • Philosophy        Conceptions of education
  • History Trends in education, starting from John Dewey
  • Society             Political, social and economic impacts on education

 

Management Skills

            Like any group with leadership responsibilities in public life, principals and superintendents face complex and multiple organizational and human relations problems. The tools of management feature conspicuously in their conversations, and they speak of the need to organize and manage their work in order to accomplish their educational purposes. Issues on which respondents focused included:

 

  • Site councils     How to run a good site council
  • SIP’s                School improvement planning
  • Partnerships      Partnerships with business, parents and the community
  • Grants              Obtaining and managing grants
  • Conflict            Managing conflict
  • Meetings          Running effective and efficient meetings
  • Strategic thinking          Dealing strategically with the demands of the multitudes of interactions, issues and problems.
  • Budgets            Dealing with problematic budgets and restricted finances
  • Industrial issues Labor negotiations
  • Community and parent relations            Linking productively with parents
  • Decision-making processes       Central vs. participatory decision-making
  • Parental Involvement     Involving parents meaningfully in children’s education

 

 

 

Staff Management

            Respondents also focused on the need to learn how to effectively manage their staff as part of the art of leadership. They wished to learn how to enculturate teachers into forms of inquiry based education and help them break out of rigid approaches to teaching.

  • Professional development          Organizing staff professional development. Knowing how to develop a learning community, so that staff could learn from each other and develop sound teaching/learning practices
  • Motivation                    Motivating staff
  • Avoiding burnout          Ways to assist staff keep going and avoiding burn-out
  • Duties                           How to use staff: Defining and allocating roles and duties

 

Technology

            Most respondents were clearly aware of the potential for increasing efficiency through the use of computer technology and some were also concerned that it be used effectively for teaching/learning purposes. Issues emerging from their conversations included;

  • Evidence-based practice           Using data to substantiate your work.
  • Data management         Managing the large amounts of information that accumulates in a school
  • Internet How to use the internet as a resource
  • Instructional technology Applications of technology in teaching and learning--what it can and cant do for kids

 

Conclusion

            While the curriculum issues outlined above may not be fully comprehensive, they provide a clear guide to the types of issues principals and superintendents identified as significant components of a leadership program. They therefore provide the basis for a more detailed curriculum development process that incorporates the professional development needs of administrators as well as encompassing state licensure standards.

 

Program Instruction and Learning

 

“Program instructors need to model good practice.”

 

This quote signals the desire of administrators to encompass licensure requirements within a program of learning that would have direct applicability to their professional development. Above all, they felt that the program of learning should be enjoyable, invigorating and inspiring, providing the means to re-energize them and enhance their professional lives—“Something that is motivating and helps us focus on what we are really about.” If it became tedious it would defeat the purpose of the program. Instructors in the program should ensure that participants experience the positive leadership processes they were expected to demonstrate in their professional life. Respondents suggested ways that instructional processes could facilitate their learning:

 

  • Experienced instructors “School reform processes require people who have demonstrated effective principalship”
  • School improvement                 Exploration of successful school improvement models
  • Exploring the literature  Being part of a literary support group that read and discussed current articles and papers. “These things get you going.”
  • Teacher-leaders            Using teacher-leaders in the program. “We administrators have a lot to learn from really good teachers.”
  • Educational orientation  A focus on teaching and learning, curriculum, staff development, supervision, not on administrative practices
  • Practicum                     Building in a practicum that enables people to get practical experience working alongside a principal
  • Integration                    Continuity and integration between the different parts of the program

 

One respondent spoke of the benefits of linking program learning with ongoing professional development. “I would like to work by setting essential questions for myself, weaving them through what I do on a day-to-day basis. The program could keep me engaged in that [on-going] inquiry that would have a product at the end”—referring to improved understanding of her role and her leadership practices. She linked this to the inquiry based learning within a cohort: “There’s so much to be gained by having other eyes provide feedback about what you’re doing.”

School-University Partnerships

            The inception of a leadership program provides a unique opportunity to develop productive relationships between the university and associated school districts. One superintendent spoke of the benefits to be gained from such a partnership with the university, and indicated that university could contribute to the development of schools in a number of ways. “Our central mission is student achievement. There’s a huge disconnect between what we’re doing in the schools to ensure that kids reach high levels of success and what we do as administrators.” She suggested that administrators needed to know how to promote student success, even when those things went against the grain of current policies like standardized testing. She indicated she was searching for something that would engage her in finding out “what I’m really doing here as an administrator”.

            These comments point to possibilities for developing a research agenda centered on school improvement. Administrators commented on the benefits to be gained from a well-resourced school change process. This could be associated with program course work that provided direct input to a principal’s school improvement planning.

      Some respondents commented on the benefit of offering professional development short courses for superintendents and principals. Leadership program activities could be linked to an externally funded professional development program that was made available to interested administrators. “A really good superintendent’s Institute would attract people from around the state.”  One superintendent suggested that the university could convene short professional development brown bag seminars or study groups that enabled administrators to get past finances and budgets and to share ideas with others who’ve worked through particular issues, or gain input from experts.

Conclusion

            This study has demonstrated the clear support of administrators in the region for an educational leadership program. It provides a substantial body of information that should inform the continuing processes of curriculum development. Decisions would need to be made about the relationship between levels of the program and the necessary sequencing of priorities at different levels in order to provide an appropriate curriculum for the different levels of experience of program participants. 

The full potential and economic viability of the program would be enhanced if it were associated with the development of program of research and general professional development offerings for administrators in the region. In developing partnerships with schools and districts in the region the program also has the potential to enhance other educational programs in the university, including particularly the teacher education program.

            As consultant I would like to thank the superintendents and principals who gave so generously of their time. As a group of administrators they provide evidence of the strong leadership provided for schools in the area, their thoughtful and creative comments providing, in total, the basis for a strong and productive educational leadership program at Southern Oregon University.

 


 

 

 

APPENDIX E:

 

Memo and Assessment of Library Resources

 

584-017-0050

Resources

 


 

Memo and Assessment of Library Resources

 

Library Resources for Administration Program

 

Memorandum

 

 

Date:    November 9, 2007

 

To:       Ken Kempner, Education

 

From:    Dale Vidmar,

Library Instruction Coordinator/

Education, Communication, and Health & Physical Education Librarian

 

 

Attached is a report that provides an assessment of the Hannon Library collection in support of the proposed certificate program for Continuing Administrative Licensure Program. Although the report is not exhaustive, the intent is to detail current information about the nature and extent of library and research material related to the program and in particular courses surrounding school supervision, evaluation of instruction, mentoring, school management and organization, educational change, school improvement programs, and educational planning—particularly the strengths and shortcomings of the collection. The result of the assessment is a recommendation that some of the current education book allocation is directed toward adding material that would fill some existing gaps in our Hannon Library collection.

 

 


An Assessment of the Hannon Library’s Collection

in Support of the Continuing Administrative Licensure Program

 

November 9, 2007

 

Background Comments:

 

Because the Library has a strong collection in support of Education and Psychology, particularly with respect to our partially full-text databases—ERIC and Education Full-Text—and recent full-text online journal collections such as JSTOR and others, the Continuing Administrative Licensure Program has adequate resources to support the program. However, due to recent budget cuts to our book collection, particularly the complete cut the Library endured during the 2006-07 academic year, more recent books—within the past five years after 2000—is less available in the Hannon Library. Therefore, for those materials, students and faculty would need to rely more on Summit, the Orbis Cascade Alliance library consortium composed of public and private colleges, community colleges, and universities throughout the Northwest. The combined collection in Summit would supply ample additional support in the subject area—primarily because the program focuses on developing practitioners requiring critical, current literature found primarily in journals. 

 

 

Current Collection:

 

The Hannon Library maintains a substantial collection to support education degree programs. One of the nine professional library faculty is designated as the Education Librarian and works collaboratively with the School of Education to select monographs, serials, and databases for the Library; to coordinate library instruction for education students; and to facilitate student and faculty research projects using library resources. Librarians also provide reference assistance and other library services to Education faculty and students. The Reference Desk is staffed 59 hours of the total 86 hours per week that the Library is open during the regular academic year. The Education librarian is also available by appointment and answers email within 24 hours 7 days a week. In addition, a 24/7 chat virtual reference service is available from the Hannon Library Web site.

 

The following evaluation reflects collection totals within the SOU Library Catalog and within the Summit Catalog for materials specifically under the subject headings related to the Initial Administrative Licensure Program. There was a significant reduction in retrieved items when limiting the search to materials after 2000. Holdings in related subject headings are as follows:

 

Subject Heading                                    SOU Catalog                            Summit

                                                Total                 After 2000        Total                 After 2000

School Supervision                     33 titles             1 titles               192 titles           19 titles

School Management and

      Organization                        199 titles           22 titles             1664 titles         163 titles

Mentoring in Education              8 titles               5 titles               114 titles           49 titles

Educational Change—U.S.        168 titles           48 titles             1232 titles         360 titles

Educational Planning—U.S.       21 titles             3 titles               288 titles           34 titles

School Improvement Programs   7 titles               4 titles               193 titles           95 titles

 

The selection of subject headings was based on objectives and readings stated in the proposed course syllibi. While this select group of subject headings does not fully indicate the level of resources available, it indicates that the collection both in the University Library and Summit has been affected by recent budget reductions in the book collections. As a result, there is a need to concentrate some funds toward enhancing the collection in the subject areas—especially due to better access to book collections through catalog enhancements and outside sources such as Google Book Search. Collection development in these areas could be achieved through the use of existing funds from the current allocation or other self-support funds primarily because the program focuses on developing practical skills and case studies. The current funding allocation for the 2007-2008 academic year is $2543, but this is after only $63 of funding for any purchases during 2006-2007.

 

Budget Allocations for the School of Education

           

            Academic Year             Appropriation (monographs only)

            2007-2008                                 $2,543

            2006-2007                                 $     63 

            2005-2006                                 $2,593

            2004-2005                                 $1,525

            2003-2004                                 $3,780

            2002-2003                                 $4,110

            2001-2002                                 $4,375

            2000-2001                                 $4,600

            1999-2000                                 $3,400

            1998-1999                                 $3,000

 

These numbers indicate the trend of reducing the book budget for the department over the past five years despite the inflation of material prices during the same period.

 

 

Online Databases for Journal Articles and ERIC Documents

 

The recent trend in the Hannon Library has been toward canceling print subscriptions in favor of purchasing more online access to full-text resources. Over the past 10 years, the Library’s list of databases has included the major databases in support of a graduate level Education curriculum—ERIC (Educational Information Resource Center), EDRS (ERIC Document Reproduction Service), and Education Full-Text. These databases have been adding more full-text materials in recent years. In addition, the Hannon Library has added six full-text online journal packages such as JSTOR, Sage Publications, and others. Full-text access to educational journals has improved over the past two years. For example, a subject heading search for “leadership” retrieves 4,264 articles published after 2000, of which 1,835 are full-text articles in the ERIC database. Nearly 43% of the articles are available full-text. The same search in 2005 yielded only 16% full-text. In the Education Full-Text database, a subject search for “leadership” produced 1631 articles published after 2000—959 of which are full-text. Of particular note, 33 of the full-text articles cited in the Education Full-Text database were published in peer reviewed journals during the past year.

 

Given that much of the student research is embedded in classes and through practicum, participants should find many of the needed resources in the education databases currently under subscription in the Library. Although the Hannon Library does not have a subscription or access to full-text to some would be useful additions to our collection, overall, the collection is very substantial. Currently, the Hannon Library has access to a wide range of journals in the subject area of school organization and administration, such as the following:

 

Principal Leadership from the National Association of Secondary School Principals

Educational Leadership from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Education Administration Quarterly

Educational Review

International Electronic Journal for Leadership in Learning

Educational Policy

American Secondary Education

Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis

NASSP Bulletin

 

In conclusion, the review of available resources in the Hannon Library’s online databases and journal collection indicates that a wide range of materials exist to support the Continuing Administrative Licensure Program. In fact, the online databases and full-text access to journals at the Hannon Library is a major strength in support of this program, particularly because more recent studies, trends, and other current information is generally located in educational journal articles and ERIC documents.

 

Recommendation:

 

The analysis of the Hannon Library’s resources to support the Continuing Administrative Licensure Program indicates strong support in the journal and documents area. However, the Education Department should work collaboratively with the Library’s Education liaison to concentrate some existing book funds toward purchasing material that would fill gaps in our current collection. Given the major reductions that the department allocations have experienced over the past few years, it may be necessary to provide a one-time funding of $650 to achieve an allocation close to the 2002-2003 fiscal expenditure. The funding would allow students access to additional materials beyond the case studies and other journal articles available from the ERIC and Education Full-Text databases.


 

 

 

APPENDIX F:

 

Proof of Official Institutional Support

 

584-017-0010

Designation of the Unit

 

 

 

 


 

School of Education

Meeting Minutes- Tuesday Nov. 20, 2007

 

Attendees: Geoff Mills, Amy Belcastro, Anita Caster, Younghee Kim, John King, Tish Brann, Roni Adams, Ken Kempner, Margaret Perrow, Margaret Wright, Brad Fritts, Gregg Gassman, Angela Huftill, Linda Hilligoss, Dennis Jablonski, K.C. Sam, Shantrin Lininger, Kouba Sayre, Steve Thorpe

 

-William update

-Z update

-Dave Kichel memoriam

-Report from Geoff’s provost meeting- the provost has really been reading FPRAPs and has been impressed by our work and diligence

-Winter- coverage of HR & HDCL- possibility of Margaret Perrow for HDCL.

Spring has adjustments as well

-We must have contingencies and have flexibility as we learn more about the health of our colleagues.

 

MLL

-Proposal has been made to provost, and approved, that we will run MLL in Portland after AERA

-Contract with ECP to do logistics CR I & II

- goal is to build capacity

-Younghee- CR I March 31st, Apr 1, 2, 3

CR II- Apr. 4, 5, 6 Friday- Saturday- Sun

-So far, about 5 folks coming from US, and 3 from Australia

-First phase- Portland retreat center that Geoff will arrange

-Fee will be approximately $1200 for attendance

-CRII for SOU faculty will be funded from EDU budget. 

 

Orate

Reminder about ORATE (Mar 7) proposals are due Dec. 3

Also in February is the Oregon Reading Association- Linda has proposal accepted and will take students up to the conference- last year there was 15 students.

 

TSPC Pre-visit

Geoff thanked everyone for their participation in last Friday’s TSPC visit

“Accreditation is everybody’s business”

Rethinking our roles as coordinators, faculty so that we cover all the bases. Folks should check the boxes in EP 107 that contain accreditation material from last time to learn more about what to expect.

 

Dreaming

What is our changing identity? Reaffirm or recreate yourself, so that we know what to look for in faculty searches.

Early childhood focus

Literacy?

Administration?

SPED?

Suggestion to put up chart of competencies and wishes

FTE loading is an issue because of MED cancellations

We have many staffing issues so that we need to plan well.

We have 4 self-support programs:

MED

ESOL

Undergrad

Early childhood

Fall-Winter Spring 2YRMAT and also IAL are now captured in general fund.

 

We will have the ELU discussion next meeting

 

CAL

Ken- we have approval from the Graduate Council to move forward with a Continuing Adminstrator Licensing program. Our numbers are down from first year but PSU will no longer be offering IAL, so we think that this development should infuse our program. One strategy for a few courses will be to create a connection with ESD to mentor administrators so students will go to workshops and then return to SOU seminar classes.

Ken presented the matrix of the proposed courses. Discussion ensued and then the faculty unanimously voted to approve CAL proposal.

 

Margaret- What is official 2 year program name? Angela said she refers to it as the 2 year part-time MAT.  (2YPTMAT)

 

Linda- Faculty Senate is encouraging feedback on SOU mission statement.

 

Shantrene- SOTEL grant update- we have 30 pre-service applicants for 10 slots.  17 in-service applications for 15 slots. Application deadline for Round 2 is going to be May not January.

 

Gregg- We need to appoint an alternate for UPC as replacement for William. Ken agreed to be the UPC alternate.

 

 

 

 


Graduate Council Minutes:

Nov. 16 2007

 

Present:  Council Members: Dan Harvey, Laura Jones, John Laughlin, Fraser Pierson, Eric Levin

            Paul Steinle (provosts office),  Dan Morris (FLL), Anne Connor (FLL), Hart Wilson (Bus), Ken           Kempner (Edu)

 

Minutes: Eric Levin

 

Announcements:

1.      minutes from May 27, 2007 were approved

2.      the committee confirmed Eric Levin’s election to the chairmanship of the council

3.      OSLA Scholarship process was delineated

 

Updates:

            Business from the previous year which needs to be addressed this year was       discussed:

1.      criteria for graduate level components of split level classes (400/500 level)

2.      TOEFL, sent back from faculty senate.  Should the current requirements be maintained or should we allow specific ESL classes to meet this requirement

3.      Approval of graduate faculty list

4.      Development of a graduate studies office

5.      development of a graduate assistanceship utilizing empty student housing units in lieu of money

 

Action Items:

1.      Masters in Spanish Language Teaching, new master’s program presentation by Dan Morris and Anne Connor.  Passed 5-0, will be on Fac. Senate agenda 12/3/07

2.      Continuing Administrative License, new grad level program by Ken Kempner.  Passed 5-0, will be on Fac. Senate agenda 12/3/07,

            Remaining question, does this program need to be sent to OUS Provost            Council for approval

3.      Split level graduate criteria for Non-profit Cert. Program by Hart Wilson and John Laughlin, passed 4-0 (Laughlin abstaining).

 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:45
IAL Advisory Committee Minutes

May 21, 2007

3:30 – 5:00, Southern Oregon ESD

 

 

Present: Julie D’Chiro, Steve Boyarski, Ken Kempner, Geoff Mills, Cynda Rickert, Pam Zackland

 

 

 

1.  Review evaluation of last year’s cohort

         Shared evaluation report conduced by Ernie Stringer.  The response from the previous cohort was overwhelmingly positive.  A few issues to consider that Ernie found, mainly related to the practicum experience.  Discussion of how to keep the program vital, related to the responses ensued.  Julie mentioned trying to avoid the “tyranny of the mundane” in providing experiences for the IAL students.

 

 

2.  Address strengthening the mentor experiences for the cohort.

    -Providing a quality practicum experience was the basis for the discussion.  We can’t assume that all mentors will know how best to make a meaningful experience.  We also might want to consider using retired administrators as mentors to insure a more supervised experience.  Relying on one’s principal to know how best to create a good practicum is not always a good assumption.  Although we developed the handbook, perhaps more instruction and advice is needed with the mentors at the beginning of the experience.  The practicum should be seen as part of the professional community and, perhaps, be tailored over a 3-6 year window.  Connecting better to the ESD will also help strengthen the mentor experience.

 

3.  Progress on the CAL proposal

    Shared the latest iteration of the proposed CAL.  The principal change was to distinguish between the content of the focused seminar and the interdisciplinary courses.  Juli, in particular, recommended we maintain a strong focus on content along with flexibility in the approach; that is, recognizing the differing needs of administrators at different stages of their career.  Again, working with the ESD will be critical to implementing the CAL.  With potential legislation pending regarding the “Chalkboard initiatives”, there is the possibility of funding for professional development for administrators that could occur in conjunction with the CAL.  How we can also use COSA and OSBA are important issues, as well, to consider and integrate into the CAL.

     The proposal was approved.

 

4.  Next Year:

     -Cohort.

 

    -Program changes

         As previously discussed, Ken explained that the structure of the program has worked well with slight modifications to assignments, guests, and areas to be covered more in depth—depending on background of the cohort.  Understanding the background and interests of the new group, guided by the standards, has allowed flexibility to try out different approaches to the basic subject matter.


 Teacher Education Committee Minutes

May 2, 2006

 

Present:  Geoff Mills, Laura Jones, Angela Huftill, Ken Kempner, Cyndee Wallace, Linda Hilligoss, William Greene, Steve Thorpe, Charlotte Hadella, Scott Rex, Eric Levin, Amy Belcastro

 

Part-time MAT Program:  Amy would like to set a cap each year based on the number of available placements.  The current students will be starting the second year and will be going out into the field.  They will be expected to be in their placement for the entire first week of school – and then an average of three hours per week for the duration of fall.  Winter quarter they will do their half-time teaching but it will look different than the full-time MAT schedule.  They will spend an average of three hours per week in their new classroom for the month of January – and then they’ll start their teaching in February.  At that time they will be in the classroom all day every day until spring break.  Spring full-day teaching will look the same as in the full-time program.

 

Out of state tuition:  The part-time program is self-support.  Therefore, ECP sets tuition and it is not dependent on instate or out of state.  The reciprocity agreement with northern California is only for undergraduates.

 

Orientations:  The Special Ed orientation for new students will be held on May 5, and the MAT new student orientation will be held on May 12.  Committee members are welcome to attend.

 

Celebration:  The Celebration will be held on May 18.  All are welcome – invitations were handed out (and sent via campus mail to those not in attendance).

 

Faculty searches:  There are currently 72 applications for the MAT position.  The search committee plans to bring candidates to campus in late May/early June.  Special Ed has 9 applications for their open position.  A search will be starting soon for a science educator at Crater Lake and other field sites.

 

Business advisor:  There has been no one assigned as of May 2.

 

Pre-requisite discussion:  Maria, Margaret, and Anita made inquiries at all Oregon schools (public and private) that have teacher preparation programs.  There were very few pre-requisite lists to be found.  Most schools only require a degree and passing scores on the appropriate Praxis exams.  Charlotte reported that she allowed students to enter  for 2006-07 with only the Praxis scores – time will tell if that’s sufficient.  Geoff leaves it to the subject advisor to use professional judgment about waiving pre-req courses.

 

Continuing Administrative License (CAL):  Ken distributed a proposal for the CAL.  It will be 27 credits and will be integrated – using graduate courses from other departments as well as Education courses.

Decision:  Proposal approved


Southern Oregon Education Consortium Minutes

April 27, 2006

 

Present:  Linda Hilligoss, William Greene, Jeremy Stahmer, Shannon Lewis, April Harrison, Gregg Gassman, Ken Kempner, Geoff Mills, McKael Ziegler, Lauren Wasserman, Virginia Petitt

 

TSPC Annual Report:  The comments are similar every year – communication issues, etc.  The Cooperating Teachers will complete surveys this year at the Celebration or online.  The MAT students will complete their survey this summer in Zinn’s class.  The SPED students will complete theirs at the end of spring term.

Action:  Reviewed and Accepted

 

Orientation:  Students are working on getting volunteers to help with break-out groups at the MAT orientation.  SPED – May 5     MAT – May 12

 

Celebration:  Students are working on the entertainment – there will be a slide show, a performance by the Hawaii club, and a skit by the SPED cohort.  Please, do not bring gifts for your CT.

 

Continuing Administrative License (CAL):  Ken distributed a proposal for the CAL program.  It will be 27 credits and will integrate courses from other departments.  The portfolio element is unique to the SOU program and will meet TSPC requirements.

Decision:  Approved

 

Marioni Scholarship Fund:  The Rogue Runners for Reading raised $1000.  There were six participants.  They are in the process of sending thank you notes to the donors.  Lauren and McKael are willing to come back next year to get the new group of students started.

 

Faculty Searches:  We will be hiring two new MAT faculty to replace Kay Sag miller, Joan Marioni, and Arnie Abrams.  SPED will be hiring a new faculty member to replace Mary Greenwood.

 

Program Update:  Numbers are up for next year.  There are 97 in the full-time MAT program, 30 in the part-time program, 20 in the IAL program, and 23-25 in the SPED program.  We are hoping to partner with the ESD to provide professional development for administrators.

 

Student Feedback:  There was some discussion about holding the Ed Fair before the Portland job fair next year.  SPED likes the idea, but it’s not as useful for those in regular ed.

 


 

 

 

APPENDIX G:

 

Research within the Administrative

 License Program

 

584-017-0210

Purpose for Administrator License

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY

 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESEARCH WITHIN THE

INITIAL ADMINISTRATIVE LICENSURE PROGRAM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernie Stringer

Mary Greenwood

Wilkins O’Reilly Zinn

Ken Kempner

 

April 18-26, 2005

 

 

Executive Summary

 

            Discussions with principals and superintendents suggest that research could play a significant role in enhancing the strength of the leadership program. The following issues emerged from interviews:

Principals’ Research Capacities

·        There was a need for principals to have the capacity to engage in practically-oriented research

·        Research processes should focus on processes for finding solutions to complex issues and problems that principals confront in their daily work in the schools (e.g. achieving success for all students, especially high need groups)

·        Research processes should also enable them to accomplish the significant planning and development tasks related to the operation of the school

·        Principals needed to be able to understand and interpret data to accomplish   desired outcomes

·        They also need to be able to evaluate the strength and significance of current educational research

·        Research teams comprised of program participants, principals and university faculty could make a strong contribution to the schools

Teaching/Learning Processes in the Initial Licensure Program

  • Learning in the program should focus on the practical realities of the principal’s work
  • Inquiry learning processes or small action research projects would provide a strong vehicle for accomplishing multiple learning tasks and integrating diverse elements of the program

Recommendations

  • The IAL team continue to explore ways to integrate inquiry learning, problem-solving processes and action research into the instructional processes of the program
  • Steps be taken to provide orientation to adjunct staff to ensure that all instruction in the program continues to focus on the practical work tasks of the principal
  • A part-time research coordinator be appointed to assist in identifying student research projects and linking students and schools with appropriate faculty

 

 

 

 


 

 

Introduction

            The purpose of this study was to ascertain principal and school research needs, with the intent of seeing where it might fit in the Initial Administrator Licensure Program. Principals and superintendents who have been associated with the development of the program were interviewed and the resulting information used as the basis for this report. On the basis of  comments of those interviews there is a clear place for research in the IAL program, both in terms of developing the research capacity of principals and using processes of research/inquiry as the basis for teaching/learning processes within class requirements.

            Apart from comments on research, those interviewed made strong, unsolicited comments that reinforced their desire for a strongly pragmatic program that provided participants with the capabilities of dealing with the multiple demands and ongoing contingencies that were part of the principal’s school experience. The implications of these comments for the ongoing development of the program are therefore included in this report.

Practically-Oriented Research

            A strong theme running through interviews was the need for principals to be able to engage in practically-oriented research, defined by some as action research. As one administrator said, “The program should have students engaged in pragmatic research related to significant issues in the school, and work in conjunction with a principal and/or the district.” Another indicated that “Educators need to learn how to look at data and use research to determine what steps they need to take….to do some research on that and bring solutions.” The implication of this and other comments was that principals need to be able to engage in systematic processes of inquiry with staff at their school to enable them to:

·        Develop solutions to complex problems that were an ongoing part of the life of a school

·        Accomplish significant leadership tasks, such as the development of school improvement plans

·        Evaluate the strength or significance of research related to significant areas of school life

 

Most respondents focused on research as a necessary part of the principals’ ongoing work. As one indicated, “[Research] as part of a problem solving process. It seems like that’s what we do these days. We all have an unending stream of problems we have to solve.” Another built on this notion, indicating how, in realigning the curriculum and the building [organizational] structure to match testing principals would need to find the best way to do that, and to be able to evaluate the effect of new instructional practices and ways of organizing the schools.

Administrators also saw research as a means of developing the capacity of principals to deal with multiple demands and multiple agendas associated with the work of a principal. As one respondent indicated “People can start with an issue, like poverty, then spin off, learning a lot of things that are related to that issue—they can research the issue [thoroughly].”

 

Purposes and Processes of Research

            In the current context there is considerable pressure on schools to accomplish increased performance, as measured by student test scores, student retention rates, increased attendance, and so on. Respondents therefore spoke of the need for principals to be able to not only engage in processes of inquiry to identify ways of accomplishing these requirements, but of being able to deal with the related data. One superintendent also pointed to the need for schools or districts to develop ways of evaluating student outcomes that more closely reflected the multiple outcomes required of educating children. She indicated that [quote] test scores don’t tell the whole story, but at the moment that was all they had. [1]

Underlying these comments, in the current NCLB context, was the need for principals to know processes for gathering, analyzing and interpreting data, and relating these processes to the accomplishment of desired outcomes. It was critical, in this process, to realize that data on test scores was a measure related to the children’s success, but that interpretation of data needed to be done within a framework not of just increasing test scores, but teaching in ways that enabled children to learn—to learn to be literate, to be mathematical, to be a literate person. As another indicated, the goal of teaching is not to meet AYP or NCLB behind standards, these being merely measures. The real goal was to “increase student success”, and that is about “finding ways to help kids to be successful”, “to make a difference for kids”.

Thus while there was a need for research skills that would assist in accomplishing federal and state mandates, an underlying theme pointed to the need for principals to acquire broader capacities. As one said “I hope the new program would develop habits of mind--of inquiry and reflection,” stated by others in terms of being able to act as educational leaders rather than administrative functionaries. This meant the ability to interpret data in terms of the broader picture of what’s happening to kids in their educational life, rather than just focusing on test scores.

Administrators also spoke of the need to be able to evaluate the worth or strength of research studies, and to be able to engage in meta-analyses of the broad range of available research. One indicated that this would provide principals with a firmer footing against which to judge the worth of particular practices and minimize the possibility that they become side-tracked by single studies.

Respondents also indicated that by engaging in research with their staff principals would build the capacity of teachers to engage in significant educational developments in their classrooms. As leaders they would work with staff to review the data on children’s performance and determine what steps they needed to take in their school. They should be able to empower staff to engage in practical research that enabled them to develop solutions to the problems that emerged from reviewing the data.

 

Respondents therefore noted that principals should become competent in a number of research-related areas:

  • Establishing baseline data
  • Using data as a “lubricant” for developments
  • Analyzing and interpreting data
  • Applying analyses to a broad framework of desired educational outcomes
  • Identifying processes for improving performance in designated areas
  • Identifying populations or groups needing special attention
  • Monitoring developments and performance levels
  • Evaluating existing research

Faculty Involvement

            Almost all administrators responded favorably to the idea that SOU faculty might become involved in research related to the leadership program. As part of a team that included program participants and principals, faculty were seen as potential resources that could greatly increase the capacity of students to engage in meaningful, relevant and useful research. Not only would faculty bring expertise in their particular area of expertise, but their knowledge of research processes would enhance the strength of the research. Administrators saw the benefit of developing a “learning community” that could identify areas of mutual interest that would benefit the work of the schools. As one noted, however, teams would need to carefully define research agendas and carefully define roles and responsibilities so that everyone was clear about who was doing what.

            This would have a double benefit, as faculty would increase their understanding of the realities of school life, and update their knowledge of the factors effecting schools in the current era. This potentially would enhance their teaching within undergraduate and graduate programs of the college.

            A further benefit would be to validate the program and provide it with a distinctive profile that would set it apart from other leadership programs. As one administrator expressed enthusiastically, “I think it would be wonderful. Quite frankly, it would validate this program to have faculty engaged the whole way….That would separate our program from other programs.”

            One administrator added a cautionary note, however, indicating the need for faculty to demonstrate both a commitment to the schools and the ability to interact with principals and teachers in an appropriate way. The implication was that in the past some faculty had not followed through on promised research activity and there was the danger that some faculty might communicate with school staff in a way that was “not useful.”

 

Teaching/Learning Processes Within the Program

            Principals and superintendents continued to make strong, unsolicited comments regarding the orientation of the program. They continued to focus on the need for program content to be responsive to the practical realities of a principal’s daily work tasks, and for learning processes within classes to provide program participants with the capacities to deal with the complex problems principles face on a day-to-day basis. Although most recognized the need for a strong theoretical component to the program that would provide participants with a broader perspective, they implied that the theory should derive from a focus on practice. They further implied that learning tasks and requirements within the program should relate to the practical working tasks of principals and provide them with opportunities to develop associated skills.

One respondent characterized these needs succinctly. He suggested that it was not sufficient for program participants to merely understand the issues, but to know how to take action steps to resolve those issues—“how to make it happen!” He indicated that many leaders come through programs that provide them with a conceptual understanding of the issues but do not provide them with an operational understandings that enable them to deal with the issues. He was adamant that the program should move participants from the conceptual to the operational, to help future leaders operationalize the knowledge they gain in the program.

Respondents were particularly concerned that program participants should not engage in what one characterized as “busy work”—commentary, reflections, discussion, etc. not associated with the actual practice of principal work tasks. As one indicated, “Instructors need to provide pragmatic, practical ways of dealing with issues. They need to have substantive content rather than just dialogue about issues.”  

            Administrators also spoke of the need to have experienced administrators as instructors in the program. Although SOU faculty with limited experience as administrators could facilitate learning processes, program participants also needed significant input from people who could “tell stories from the trenches.” This would add both strength and credibility to the program.

 

Conclusion

            Administrators in this study clearly saw the value of integrating research as a significant component of the IAL, both as a set of skills that could enhance the work of a principal, and as an approach to learning within the program. There is a clear mandate for SOU to develop a research agenda that would serve the needs of the IAL, in the first instance, but establish a resource that could be of great benefit to the schools and school systems in Southern Oregon. A thoroughly grounded program of research focused on the significant issues now confronting principals and other administrators would not only attract research funding, but would enhance and enrich the life of the university, providing opportunities for faculty to extend their academic lives and enrich their teaching.

            This will not happen, however, unless systematic and strategic steps are taken to establish a program of research in the schools, identifying appropriate projects and establishing links with faculty who have relevant expertise and interests. In the current context, this could be easily facilitated by small-scale studies initiated by participants in the IAL. These relationships have the potential to lead to larger research projects that will establish SOU as a significant resource for educational research in the region. In these circumstances I would suggest the School of Education establish a part-time research coordinator with initial responsibilities for facilitating the development of research projects within the IAL and linking appropriate faculty to research teams that emerge.


 

APPENDIX H:

 

Program Development Process

 

584-017-0030

Evaluation and Improvement of the Program

584-017-0230

Retention and Advising

 

 


 

 

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS


Review Process for Development of CAL Program

 

January-May 2006

Proposal development meetings and work sessions: SOU faculty and Advisory Committee

April 27, 2006

Approval of Southern Education Consortium

May 2, 2006

Approval of Teacher Education Committee

October 6, 2006

School  of Education retreat; presentation of CAL proposal

November 9, 2006

Teacher Ed. Consortium meeting; CAL discussion

November 14, 2006

IAL Advisory Committee Meeting and CAL discussion

January 29, 2007

Meeting with ESD Supt and School Improvement Director to discuss CAL proposal

February 15, 2007

Discussion of CAL proposal with Teacher Ed. Consortium

February 23, 2007

Conference call with Ernie Stringer, consultant, on CAL proposal

March 15, 2007

Meeting with Patti Kinney, Principal Talent Middle School, to discuss CAL proposal

May 10, 2007

MAT, MEd, SPEd review of CAL proposal: Gassman and Belcastro

May 11, 2007

IAL Seminar and presentation of CAL proposal for review

May 15, 2007

School of Education Faculty meeting: CAL discussion

May 17, 2007

SOU Graduate Council: CAL proposal discussion

May 21, 2007

Advisory Board Committee: CAL proposal discussion and approval

May 30, 2007

School of Education retreat; discussion of CAL proposal

July 11, 2007

Meet with Barry Vitcov, consultant, to discuss CAL program

September 28, 2007

IAL Seminar and discussion of CAL program requirements

October 3, 2007

Meeting with SOE Dean and SPED director on CAL program

October 30, 2007

Meeting at ESD with Supt and School Improvement Director to review CAL program

November 16, 2007

CAL program approval by SOU Graduate Council

November 19, 2007

Meet with Jesse Pershin, Principal Rogue River HS, to discuss CAL program curriculum

November 20, 2007

School of Education CAL proposal approval

November 28, 2007

Advisory Committee meeting to review CAL program

January 14, 2008

SOU Senate Approval of CAL program

 


APPENDIX I:

 

Checklist for

Continuing Administrator License

Application Packet

 

584-017-0220

Selection, Recruitment, Admission of Candidates

 


 

CHECKLIST FOR

CONTINUING  ADMINISTRATOR LICENSE

APPLICATION PACKET

The following items must be a part of your application. Please READ carefully and check off each item as you include it in our application.

SECTION A: SUBMIT TO SOU ADMISSIONS

1. A completed Application for Graduate Admission* (included in packet) must be submitted to Admissions. Enclose $50 application fee* and mail these items to:

Admissions Office

Southern Oregon University

Ashland OR 97520

2. As indicated on the Graduate Application, request to have one set of official transcripts for all college or university coursework you have attended or are currently attending sent to Admissions. You cannot be admitted to the University without official transcripts. The official transcript must show degrees earned.

*Note for Applicants who have received a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) or Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree from Southern Oregon University:

Submit a completed Application for Enrollment of Non-Admitted and Returning Students form (blue) instead of the Graduate Admission Application above, to:

Admissions Office

Southern Oregon University

Ashland OR 97520

Please note that the Admissions Office will bill your account $15 to process this application.

As indicated on the above form, request to have an official transcript for any college or university coursework completed since you left SOU sent to the Registrar’s Office.

SECTION B: SUBMIT TO THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

1. Application for Admission to CAL (included in packet.)

2. Copy of your IAL and current teaching license, if applicable (Oregon or another state).

3. Current resume

4. Goal statement

5. Character Questions form (included in packet.)

6. TWO Recommendation for Admission Forms (included in packet). Can be submitted separately.

7. Checklist (this form)


 

 

 

APPENDIX J:

 

CAL

Course Syllabi

 

584-017-0240

Curriculum Design

584-017-0261

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Required for Initial Administrator License

584-017-0280

Field Experience for Administrator License Program

584-017-0282

Internship Experience for Administrator License Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Southern Oregon University                                     Continuing Administrator License   

School of Education                                                               Educational Leadership

 

LEAD 564 

Supervision & Evaluation of Instruction

 

Description:

This course examines the role of the building and district administrators as instructional leaders.  The approach of the course is both from theoretical and applied perspectives on effective instructional and curriculum leadership. Instructional leadership includes applying knowledge and skills about effective instruction and curriculum to improve teaching practices to increase student learning.

      As Glickman writes:  "Supervision is the function in schools that draws together the discrete elements of instructional effectiveness into whole-school action.  Research shows that those schools that link their instruction, classroom management, and discipline with staff development, direct assistance to teachers, curriculum development, group development, and action research under a common purpose achieve their objectives."  (Supervision of Instruction, p.5)

 

Course Objectives:

1.  Students will be able to formulate their own theory of supervision and leadership based on research and readings.

2.  Students will understand developmental supervision and its importance to the supervision of instruction, including mentoring and professional development.

3.  Students will understand a variety of supervisory practices and how such contribute to the development of effective teaching and the improvement of student learning.

4.  Students will understand the relationship between effective leadership and effective supervision practices.

5.  Students will practice supervision skills and demonstrate tasks that are required to improve classroom instruction.

6.  Students will understand the importance of supervision to successful school reform efforts and the development/sustaining of a dynamic learning organization.

7.  Students will understand the legal requirements for the evaluation of school personnel.

 

Course objectives

Standards addressed

Demonstration

Students demonstrate readings, practices, and cases that identify effective practices to improve school culture, programs, practices, and professional growth for faculty

2.1

 

2.2

 

2.3

 

2.4

Promote positive school culture

 

Provide effective instructional program

Apply best practice to student learning

Design Comprehensive professional growth plans

Readings, case studies, developmental readings, integration paper assignment, Practicum activities, interaction with School Board members, review of Continuous improvement plans


 

Students review the relevant practices of management, budgets, and community resources for effective instructional improvement

3.1

 

3.2

 

3.3

 

4.3

Manage the organization

 

Manage operations

 

Manage resources

 

Mobilize community resources

Class assignments, practicum activities, review with guest speakers on district budgets, analysis of school improvement plans, portfolio development of budget activities

Students review literature and activities of ethical leaders in relation to cultural competence and improving learning and achievement for all students

5.1

 

5.2

 

5.3

Acts with integrity

 

Acts fairly

 

Acts ethically

 

Readings, case studies, interviews with principals, integration paper, workshop activities on cultural competence, review of discipline and expulsion policies with guest speakers

Provide students with the opportunity to create and develop case studies that identify effective instructional practices, understanding of diversity, and multicultural differences.

2.3

 

4.1

 

4.2

 

6.1

Apply best practice to student learning

Collaborate with families and other community members

Respond to community interests and needs

Understand the larger context

Course readings, assignments, practicum activities related to course preparation and portfolio development, review of  continuous improvement plans

 

Office and email:

      -Ken Kempner: Education 156, 552-6417.  Kempner@sou.edu

                  Office Hours: Tuesday 1:00 – 3:00, Wednesday 1:30 – 4:30 and by appointment

      -Cynda Rickert: Oregon Educational Service District, 776-6771.

                  Office Hours: By appointment. Cynda_Rickert@soesd.k12.or.us

                             

Course Texts:

Blaze, Jo and Blaze, Joseph, Handbook of Instructional Leadership: How Successful Principals Promote Teaching and Learning, Corwin Press, Inc., 2004.

Glickman, Carl D., Gordon, Stephen P., and  Ross-Gordon, Jovita M., Supervision of Instruction: A Developmental Approach, Allyn and Bacon, latest edition.

 

Optional Readings and Resources:

Base, Joseph and Kirby, Peggy, Bringing Out the Best in Teachers: What Effective Principals Do, Corwin Press, 2000. 

Coppola, Albert, Scricca, Diane, and Connors, Gerald, Supportive Supervision: Becoming a Teacher of Teachers, Corwin Press, 2004.

Cotton, Kathleen, Principals and Student's Achievement, ASCD, 2003.

Danielson, Charlotte, Teacher Evaluation to Enhance Professional Practice, ASCD, 2000.

McEwan, Elaine, Seven Steps to Effective Instructional Leadership, Corwin Press, Second Edition, 2003.

Pajak, Edward, Honoring Diverse Teaching Styles: A Guide for Supervisors, ASCD. 2003. 

Zmuda, Allison, Kuklis, Robert, and Kline, Everett, Transforming Schools: Creating a Culture of Continuous Improvement, 2004.

 

COURSE FORMAT:

This course is a seminar conducted in conjunction with the Southern Oregon ESD.    Regular access to e-mail and Blackboard through the SOU website are an integral and required part of the course.  Some assignments, class activities, and course requirements will require the use of e-mail, Blackboard and meeting time outside of the seminars.

 

Course Requirements:

 

1. Attendance

      Attendance at all classes is expected. If you will be absent, it is your responsibility to inform the instructors and to make arrangements to compensate for your absence with an additional assignment or other related task.

 

2. Group Project: Case Study

      This project is to be accomplished in groups where you are to create a brief case study and presentation of an assigned supervision issue as is relates to NCLB requirements.  The purpose of the case is to pose a dilemma and how this problem was ameliorated through best practices--or, alternatively, why this problem was NOT resolved through “worst” practices.

      Your presentation of the case and its context and the discussion of your resolution will include handouts for your colleagues so that the pertinent issues and context are clearly defined. A power point presentation of the elements of this case will help illuminate this supervision issues, its resolution and how such problems can be eliminated in the future.  Your perspective should be from the District level, as it impacts the Building level. Your discussion of the issues should include references to supervision literature.

      The logic of your presentation of the case and support of this discussion in the literature will be the basis for assessing the handouts and presentation. (30 points)

 

3. Professional Development Reading

Select a book related to supervision and your role as an instructional leader, read the book and prepare a brief report. Include a brief summary of the book and a discussion of why this book is important reading for school leaders on supervision. The summary is to be posted on the Blackboard Discussion Board. Prepare to share information about your reading in class. (10 points)

 

4. Integration Paper

Identify three areas in which your district is attempting to improve teacher supervision and performance and how this is related to student outcomes.  For each area, describe how the decision was made to engage in the change effort, the implications for students and staff, and how the change effort is being assessed. Relate your findings to the role of the building and district leadership in the context of each change effort examined. (60 points)

 

Practicum Activities

a) School Board

            Attend at least one school board meeting. Interview the Superintendent to learn about how the agenda is developed and his/her perception of the relationship between school board members and district administrators. Interview at least one board member to understand her/his perception of the relationship between school board members and district administrators.

b) Continuous Improvement Plan

            Meet with the person responsible for overseeing the district’s Continuous Improvement Plan. Learn about the process the district engaged in to develop the CIP. Identify how the district will measure improvement efforts.

c) Principal interviews

            Meet with at least one administrator at the elementary level and at least one administrator at the secondary level. Learn about the relationship between building procedures, district policy, and the CIP as it impacts student outcomes.

 

Tentative Session Schedules in association with ESD workshops and seminars

First Session:    Introductions to course and faculty

                                    -Role of Theory in understanding Supervision

 

Second Session: Theory into Practice

                                    -Case Studies of best practices

 

Third Session:     Application a the District Level

                                    -Presentation of cases, critique

                                    -Final Projects

 

 

If you are in need of support because of a documented disability, whether it be learning, mobility, psychiatric, health-related, or sensory, you may be eligible for academic or other accommodations through Disability Services for Students. Contact DSS, call 541-552-6213, or schedule an appointment in person at the ACCESS Center, Stevenson Union, lower-level.


Southern Oregon University                                     Continuing Administrator License                                                                                                                      

School of Education                                                               Educational Leadership

 

LEAD 585: 

Contract Management & Human Resources

 

Description:

This course considers the responsibilities central office personnel and school building administrators have in understanding, monitoring, and maintaining labor agreements that govern employment practices at the school and district levels.  Because there are distinct responsibilities associated with maintaining agreements through the collective bargaining process, this course will examine and address critical issues related to grievances, aggregations, violations, and irregularities in the management of the collective bargaining agreement.  Methods for resolving disputes and other grievance procedures will be considered.

 

Course Objectives:

1.  Students will be able to review and analyze contracts and understand key provisions.

2.  Students will be knowledgeable about the conduct and practices that constitute unfair labor practices under state lay and be able to devise alternative strategies.

3.  Students will be able to identify the steps in a typical grievance procedure, the role of the building and district administrators, school board members, and arbitrators.

4.  Students will demonstrate how to improve their problem-solving and decision-making skills related to collective bargaining and contract management problems.

5.  Students will practice supervision skills and demonstrate tasks that are required to improve classroom instruction.

6.  Students will understand how issues related to gender, class, ethnicity affect contract management practices and identify how collective bargaining agreements address such concerns.

7.  Students will understand how access and use primary course materials related to law, rules, and cases of collective bargaining agreements.

 

 

Course objectives

Standards addressed

Demonstration

Students demonstrate readings, practices, and cases that identify effective organizational management to improve student learning and achievement in safe and culturally competent schools

2.1

 

3.1

 

3.2

 

3.3

Promote positive school culture

 

Manage the organization

 

Manage operations

 

Manage resources

Readings, case studies, developmental readings, integration paper assignment, Practicum activities, review of legal cases and human resource actions at district levels


 

Students address practices of ethical leadership, legal implications and requirements to ensure student success by acting with integrity, fairly and ethically in accordance with legal practices.

5.1

 

5.2

 

5.3

 

6.3

Acts with integrity

 

Acts fairly

 

Acts ethically

 

Influence the larger context

Class assignments, practicum activities, review with guest speakers of legal cases and Special Education practices, work with district budgets and practicum experiences with legal and personnel issues

 

                             

COURSE TEXTS:

Ruben, A.M., Elkouri, F. and Elkouri, E.A. How Arbitration Works. (6th edition). 2003.

            Hungerford, N. Oregon Labor Law Today

 

Optional Readings and Resources:

Marczely, B. and dMarczely, D. Human Resource and Contract Management in the Public             School : A Legal Perspective. 2002

 

COURSE FORMAT:

This course is a seminar conducted in conjunction with the Southern Oregon ESD.  Regular access to e-mail and Blackboard through the SOU website are an integral and required part of the course.  Some assignments, class activities, and course requirements will require the use of e-mail, Blackboard and meeting time outside of the seminars.

 

Course Requirements:

 

1. Attendance

      Attendance at all classes is expected. If you will be absent, it is your responsibility to inform the instructors and to make arrangements to compensate for your absence with an additional assignment or other related task.

 

 

2. Group Project: Case Study

      This project is to be accomplished in groups where you are to review 3 arbitration awards (provided by the instructor) and to present a brief of the situation related to the grievance.  The purpose of this exercise is to consider the contract violations, how the arbitrator decided on each of the alleged violations, and if the District prevailed and why or why not?  Presentation of the case should also consider what the District could have done differently or what could be done next time.

      Presentation of the cases, context, and the discussion of how the arbitration was resolved will include handouts for your colleagues so that the pertinent issues and context are clearly defined. A power point presentation of the elements of these cases will help illuminate this issues for contract management and collective bargaining, their resolution and how such problems may be considered in the future.  Your perspective should be from the District level, as it impacts the Building level. Your discussion of the issues should include references to the literature.

      The logic of your presentation of the case and support of this discussion in the literature will be the basis for assessing the handouts and presentation. (30 points)

 

3. Professional Development Reading

Select a book related to contract management, collective bargaining, or a related legal issue and your role as a potential district leader, read the book and prepare a brief report. Include a brief summary of the book and a discussion of why this book is important reading for school leaders. The summary is to be posted on the Blackboard Discussion Board. Prepare to share information about your reading in class. (10 points)

 

4. Integration Paper

Identify the critical areas in which your district is attempting to improve contract management and collective bargaining issues.  Describe how the decision was made to engage in the change effort, the implications for the district staff, and how the change effort is being assessed.  Relate your findings to the role of the building and district leadership in the context of contract management. (60 points)

 

Practicum Activities

a) School Board

            Attend at least one school board meeting. Interview the Superintendent to learn about how the agenda is developed and his/her perception of the relationship between school board members and district administrators. Interview at least one board member to understand her/his perception of the relationship between school board members and district administrators related to contract management.

 

b) Principal interviews

            Meet with at least one administrator at the elementary level and at least one administrator at the secondary level to discuss their perspectives on contract management issues and administration of the collective bargaining agreement.

 

 

Tentative Session Schedules

First Session:    Introductions to course and faculty

                                    -Grievance procedures and function of the ERB

 

Second Session: Arbitration standards and contract interpretation

                                    -Case Studies of district arbitrations

 

Third Session:     Application at the District Level

                                    -Presentation of cases, critique

                                    -Final Projects

 

 

If you are in need of support because of a documented disability, whether it be learning, mobility, psychiatric, health-related, or sensory, you may be eligible for academic or other accommodations through Disability Services for Students. Contact DSS, call 541-552-6213, or schedule an appointment in person at the ACCESS Center, Stevenson Union, lower-level.


Southern Oregon University                                     Continuing Administrator License   

School of Education                                                               Educational Leadership

 

LEAD 588

Cultural and Organizational Leadership

 

Description

This seminar considers advanced concepts on the application of cultural competence in relation to Organizational Theory, Behavior, and Administration.  Theoretical concepts addressed will be drawn from across the broad field of management behavior in Business, Industry, Government, and Education with a focus on cultural diversity and awareness.  Theories will include those dealing with how organizations are managed at both behavioral and administrative levels in diverse settings.   Differences across the various levels of organizations will be considered, especially as these differences affect schools and educational organizations.  This seminar will be directed toward an inquiry of effective and culturally competent organizational leadership at the district level and the various administrative components of budget, finance, evaluation, and assessment.  This seminar may be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course.

 

 

 

Course objectives

Standards addressed

Demonstration

Students demonstrate use of evaluation and assessment to inform educational reform, culture and family/community involvement, and diversity

1.3

 

1.4

Implement a vision

 

Steward a vision

Students demonstrate use of evaluation and assessment to inform educational reform, culture and family/community involvement, and diversity

Students address data-based decision making as informed by evaluation and assessment procedures

2.2

 

2.3

Provide effective instructional program

Apply best practice to student    

      learning

Students address data-based decision making as informed by evaluation and assessment procedures

Review of relevant literature on data-driven decisions and role of evaluation and assessment in school improvement

3.1

 

3.2

 

 

Manage the organization

 

Manage operations

 

 

Review of relevant literature on data-driven decisions and role of evaluation and assessment in school improvement


 

Understand and demonstrate use of evaluation and assessment tools for culturally competent decision making

4.3

Mobilize Community Resources

Understand and demonstrate use of evaluation and assessment tools for culturally competent decision making

             

 

Office and email:

      --Cynda Rickert: Eagle Point School District.

                  Office Hours: By appointment

 

Course Texts:

Hanson, E.M. 2003. Educational Administration and Organizational Behavior. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Hoy, W. and Miskel, C. 2001.  Educational Administration: Teorhy, Research, and Practice.  New York: McGraw-Hill.

 

Supplemental Readings:

March, J. and Simon, H. 1958. Organizations.  Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Murphy, J. and Louis, K.S. 1999.  Handbook of Research on Educational Administration. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Journals:

Educational Administration Quarterly

The Journal of Educational Administration

Administrative Science Quarterly

 

 

Course Requirements:

 

1. Attendance

      Attendance at all seminar sessions is expected. If you will be absent, it is your responsibility to inform the instructors and to make arrangements to compensate for your absence. Consider the content covered during your absence and negotiate a reasonable project or activity that will allow you to demonstrate proficiency and mastery of the content.

 

2. In-Basket Activity

      Meet with your practicum mentor or administrative colleague, preferably in a different district, to identify one or two critical organizational or administrative situations s/he has found particularly challenging. Based on this situation create an “in-basket” exercise you pose when hiring a new administrator for your district or building.